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    posted a message on Magnetic Copper

    ...A Magnet system wouldn't necessarily have to be realistic- goodness knows Minecraft isn't exactly known for realism. Rather, it could be combined with some of the existing vague sort of arcana system. Some ideas off the top of my head:


    -Copper Pulsar block made with Lapiz and Copper, can be set to attract or push items towards or away, regardless of item type. This would be especially useful for farms, and wouldn't necessitate so much messing around with water. That being said, the range ought to be limited to prevent it from being too overpowered, or replacing traditional farming methods entirely. Redstone signals would switch polarization. ...Maybe it also works on mobs, to some extent?


    -Copper Magnet block- this could be similar to something featured in Quark Oddities, in which the magnet block acts sort of like a piston, and is able to push or pull metal blocks within a certain range in the direction the magnet faces. This would be very helpful for elevators, doors, and all sorts of redstone machinery- and, if it only functioned on, say, Iron- such elevators would be proportionately expensive to build. (It would also be cool if this worked on minecarts!)


    -Copper Armor is weaker than Iron, but has a unique benefit that could also give copper blocks a use- when wearing copper armor while adjacent to copper blocks, the player gets certain benefits. Copper boots normally aren't that great- but if you're running on copper, it gives you a decent speed boost. The Chestplate isn't the most durable, but it allows you to quickly ascend up a copper wall. This would be an interesting new way to encourage players to use copper within their base.

    Alternatively, instead of having the normal durability mechanics, copper armor would lose durability in the same way copper weathers- semi randomly, and over a long period of time. This would be annoying, to be sure, but if copper is intended to be fairly common, it could make copper armor a sort of disposable early game set.

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on make ravengers tamable

    More mounts? Yes please! (Or at least something to make the ravager a little more useful, considering how hard they are to defeat- maybe it's just me, but Ravagers seem excessively hard to defeat. As they should be, but still.)

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on End update

    To me, at least, it seems that an End Update is not only necessary, but likely in the near future. There are some mods that do a fairly decent job, but ultimately I think this is something we will eventually see in vanilla minecraft. As was stated, the End is currently quite bland, and feels unrewarding for such a... well, End Game area of the game. There are reasons to explore, but it doesn't feel worthwhile to trek miles across a barren, hazardous, but ultimately uninteresting wasteland to find a city. I think we could see something like the Nether Update, adding new biomes, mechanics, and reasons to explore. It's merely a question of what will be added, and how.

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on Magnetic Copper

    This is a pretty neat idea- it would probably be somewhat hard to implement, but would definitely give a unique use to copper. (I'm all for anything at this point that would give copper something useful to do.)

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on Should other Structures have more variation?

    Frankly, I'd just be happy if the treasure room of desert pyramids had torches in it-perhaps it's just me, but the number of times I've entered a desert pyramid, heard a zombie, and frantically fled to avoid falling into the enormous crater... is a little irritating. I get the feeling that mobs spawning in the lower chamber and triggering the trap isn't exactly what the devs intended. (Speculation, I suppose- but I don't think it's an unreasonable assumption.)

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on (Vanilla-esque) Cities, and Why They Should be a Thing.

    Additional Concept Art for the sentinels. I'm also fiddling with a more detailed city generation concept- I figured the initial post was already more than long enough as it was.

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on (Vanilla-esque) Cities, and Why They Should be a Thing.

    Of course! That sounds neat. (In reference to the modpack idea.)

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on (Vanilla-esque) Cities, and Why They Should be a Thing.

    Before I get into another lengthy thread, I figured it might be wise to summarize why (And how) I think cities could be added to Vanilla Minecraft. And this is going to be a pretty lengthy thread, I can assure you. I usually try to keep my threads more as general discussion topics, but this is one topic I have some pretty concise ideas regarding. Take that as you will.


    - Exploration is currently lacking in Minecraft, and cities offer new incentives to Explore.


    - Cities fit, to some extent, with the existing quasi-lore of Minecraft, if they are implemented in a Vanillaesque way.


    -Cities could offer unique new challenges and scenarios for players to deal with as they see fit.


    -This Wouldn't necessitate any considerable changes to the game, in regards to new blocks, entities, etc.


    Also, just to be clear from the offset, this is just my Idea for how this could be implemented. It's by no means the only way- and whether or not such a thing is necessary is also up for debate, along with whether or not such a change would even be plausible to the main game. I would appreciate feedback on this idea! Does this seem brilliant? Does it totally not fit with Vanilla Minecraft, and just generally sound ridiculous? Criticism is important for any idea to develop properly. Or for particularly bad ideas to kick the bucket if they're really that silly, I suppose.

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    Why Should Cities be Implemented?

    As I've certainly said before, exploration is lacking in Minecraft. There aren't any particularly biome specific resources to necessitate exploration, which is a real shame considering how scenic the game can be. (I in particular think shaders, and a simple resource pack like Stay True enhance the game's atmosphere.) Ironically, this doesn't stop players from exploring- there should just be a better reason to do so then to see what's over the next hill, while already knowing that it's probably going to be more pretty terrain with nothing particularly new or useful to it.


    The main problem is that many parts of the game still feel outdated and predictable, even as interesting new content and overhauls are added to the game. Strongholds aren't particularly challenging, there isn't any particular reason to explore an Ocean Monument, you get better loot in a Desert Pyramid than a Woodland Mansion- which is both rarer and harder... I don't mean to simply be negative, but the general vibe is that once you've seen one of these structures, there's no point in finding more of them. (I ramble more on the topic in this post.)


    However, Mojang has shown us that this doesn't have to be the case. The addition of biome specific villages not only adds to the game's atmosphere, but makes exploration far more interesting. While I can appreciate the iconic nature of the previous village buildings, these places feel more alive- albeit in their own unique, minecrafty way.


    One way to encourage exploration is, simply put, to have structures or biomes rare enough that they necessitate a lengthy journey. This exists in the game as far as finding the Stronghold, searching for a Woodland Mansion, or hunting down the Elusive Mushroom Isle. However, these sort of things seem to be a let down. Both the woodland mansion and the mushroom isle are incredibly difficult to find... and neither one is particularily useful. The Woodland Mansion has some decent loot, but it's ridiculously challenging, and odds are you're going to use up more resources getting through it than you'll actually obtain. As for the Mushroom Isle... well, it isn't as if there's much there worth making the journey. The Mooshrooms are cute, I suppose, but they're not even a sustainable source of Mushrooms.


    If cities were implemented, they could do multiple things: Firstly, (And most importantly, at least to me), they would offer a new reason to explore. Secondly, they would do this by providing new challenges, new risk-reward scenarios, and new means of obtaining rare resources- or even unique ones.


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    How Would Cities be Implemented?

    To begin this bit, a disclaimer: I'm not a programmer, nor am I privy to Mojang's plans. That being said, if such a thing were to be added to Minecraft, this is how I imagine it would be added. Or at least, how I wish such a feature would be added- honestly, if I could add one thing to Vanilla Minecraft, it would be something like this.


    Generation

    Cities would be, like other parts of the game, procedural generated, but not exactly like villages. The goal wouldn't be to simply be to add larger villages.


    One of the problems with villages is their tendency towards weird generation. It's actually uncommon, (At least for me), to find a village that hasn't generated on top of a cave, or too close to a ravine, or partly buried, or merged with another structure... you get the idea. One way sandbox games like Starbound seem to avoid this problem is to have their larger NPC structures generate an area of flat terrain nearby, with a gradient of terrain transition between the normal, random terrain, and the flatter terrain around the structure itself. Usually, this is pretty seamless, and prevents weird generation on the part of the structure. (Something that Minecraft seems to have a bit of trouble with.)


    In order to avoid this problem, a simple solution would be more or less as follows: Cities have a very rare chance of generating in the same biomes that villages generate. When they do so, they first randomly select a tier, ranging from two to four- which would determine the size of the city. (Tier four being the rarest.) Once the size of the city is determined, it generates an area of flat terrain around the city that then merges with surrounding terrain, and prevents other structures from generating nearby. (It would be kind of problematic if, say, a pillager outpost generated in the same area as a city full of villagers.) I'm fairly certain, (Don't quote me on this), that most NPC structures are generated after the actual terrain, which means this would probably be sort of hard to implement, unless cities were somehow made to generate before or during terrain generation itself. (This wouldn't be perfectly flat- it would just be mostly flat and without caves in order to prevent weird generation.


    The cities themselves would all be more or less circular- consisting of multiple 'Tiers' separated by protective walls intended to keep out mobs. In a two tier city, there would be a short outer wall surrounding the bulk of the city, with a smaller inner wall protecting the middle part. Whereas a Four-Tier city would have three tiers of city, with four significantly more imposing walls. The width of each tier would be subject to vary within reasonable parameters- meaning that you could have a large city consisting mostly of simple housing with a low surrounding wall... or a smaller city with multiple tiers and more imposing walls. (Though rarer, tier four cities are invariably larger.)


    Cities would have a considerably higher chance of generating ruined than villages- with something like a 2 in 3 chance of being ruined. (That may seem a bit high, but I intend to go into it further a bit later.) They would, however, be very rare- slightly more common than Woodland Mansions, but not by much.


    On a side note, some other generation bits that might be useful-

    -Villages would be much, much more likely to generate in close proximity to a city.

    -Some sort of system would have to be implemented to try and make sure all of the city was properly lit. Considering how difficult this would be, it might be simpler just to prevent mobs from spawning within city walls.

    -Cities shouldn't be able to generate near each other- there ought to be at least a couple thousand blocks around a city where other cities cannot generate. They should, again, be a fairly rare thing to find.

    -Each of the city's 'Lots' would have plenty of different buildings that could generate on top of it- housing complexes, gardens, shops or workplaces- in order to prevent a city from consisting entirely of, say, carpenters; it would be important to prioritize a certain amount of houses, a certain amount of utilities, etc.

    -Finally, for reasons I at least think are obvious, cities shouldn't generate near spawn.


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    Aesthetic & Variation

    An important part of cities would be making sure that they fit the existing vibe of vanilla Minecraft- otherwise, they would just feel out of place. (That kind of goes without saying.) One of my favorite world-gen mods is Mcjty's 'Lost Cities,' (You can check it out here), which adds configurable, ruined cities to the game. Key word being ruined. If it added fully functional, modern cities, that would be neat... but it wouldn't fit at all with the game's aesthetic, and wouldn't be particularly playable besides. (Furthermore, the attention to detail in terms of how explosions and ruined buildings generate realisticly is fantastic.) More notably, this mod doesn't add any new blocks or entities to the game- and players tempted to mine the ruins for materials will have to deal with a great deal of mob spawners found in the ruins.


    Firstly, the cities should share a similar aesthetic to villages- that is, the sort of medieval, steampunkish, somewhat whimsical vibe that the game's structures tend to share. I know I said earlier that they shouldn't just be bigger villages... but that doesn't mean they should look completly different from villages. The general idea regarding lore, (Which, in a game like Minecraft, is really up to interpretation), is that an ancient race of builders is responsible for the various monoliths found in the game- as well as the villages. As such, (if this is the case), it sort of makes sense that this ancient race ought to have left behind some sort of cities.


    Cities, like villages, could have multiple aesthetic variations depending on which biome they generated in. (In the same way as villages, and with similar architectural styles.) The buildings themselves could essentially be larger versions of the village buildings. Each 'Tier' of the city would increase in development- the outermost tier being slums of a sort, each consecutive tier becoming more developed, with the innermost tier being some sort of temple or monolith. Different buildings would generate depending on the size and space available. There are several different ways that this could work- I'm half inclined to think this might be easier than normal villages, simply because in this case, you would know in advance that you were working with flat terrain and areas of predetermined sizes. The fact that the cities were roughly circular wouldn't be too much of an issue. (I included some concept art for generation.)


    Notably, in addition to the normal generation, cities have a decent chance of being generated ruined. A ruined city would be a dangerous place. The loot would be yours for the taking, if you were willing to deal with a variety of monster spawners and other hazards within. It's near how ruined nether portals generate as if they're collapsed- and the same could be done with ruined cities. Fallen buildings could block streets, trees could grow up from the ruins, past explosions would leave debris scattered... this would be a great opportunity both to show off some neat structure generation... and to make a really atmospheric environment.


    Uses & Intricacies

    The cities themselves would be a great means of introducing new game mechanics, while improving upon existing ones. Villagers could still trade things, to be sure, but offering better trades could unlock even bigger trades over time throughout the city. Most of this section, at this point, falls under the 'vague concepts' category, and more ideas as to what cities could be used for would be interesting.


    --- A status effect that warns players they are within city limits- in order to make them aware that breaking or attacking things will be frowned upon.


    ---In addition to Iron Golems, new types of robotic entities could be added to protect the city- seeing as villagers seem to be more pacificts. I mean, goodness knows if they even have arms. 'Sentinels' could be a smaller sort of golem that patrols the city, and could become angered if the player broke things or stole things in the city. This system would be important to prevent players from just immediately razing the city and taking all the valuable stuff. A sort of counter system would keep track of how angry the sentinels are at the player. Their anger could be decreased by giving them emeralds, in order to get away with smaller crimes. However, bigger crimes- like attacking villagers or golems- would result in all the sentinels in an area becoming very unhappy, in the same way as village iron golems turn hostile when provoked. If a player is really intent on bringing a city to its knees, they may have to worry about even more powerful sentinel variants. (...Though calling them 'sentinels' might be a bit too much like No Mans Sky.) This would also be important for the next bit.


    ---Catacombs could exist beneath cities! Infested with monsters, or perhaps malfunctioning golems and sentinels, Exploring them would be considerably more difficult- because breaking things angers the sentinels, players would be forced to navigate the catacombs without resorting to just mining away traps or circumnavigating tricky bits.


    ---Thought Pillager raids were bad enough in villages? Well, cities would provide an opportunity to make them even worse! Regarding the walls, a new unit of Pillager could be added- 'Griefers,' whose attacks involve explosions of some sort. (Of course, this would also require some means of repairing the city. Possibly another unit of robot, since I can't really imagine villagers building things?) Considering what a disaster an attack on a city ought to be, they shouldn't happen randomly. Perhaps the player does some sort of ritual in the city's center in order to summon a massive Pillager attack? The city, of course, wouldn't be defenseless. In addition to walls and golems, other protective measures could be added. (See here for a long winded idea regarding 'Shulker Turrets.') Maybe griefers also light things on fire?


    ---Some sort of bulletin board system that allows players to complete missions in exchange for emeralds with which to buy neat stuff?


    ---A way to make things even more complicated would be to add a sort of dynamic economy to cities based on what sort of utilities are present, that the player could influence in some way.


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    Even Crazier Concepts


    To finish this spiel off, some other random ideas.


    ---Special, super rare variants of cities- such as a floating city that generates in the middle of an ocean, or a flying city that generates in the sky. (I mean, there already is one reference to Laputa, isn't there?)


    ---Partly ruined minecart networks connecting cities. It would be so cool to be exploring, find a dilapidated minecart rail bridging a fair distance above the land, and follow it to a city. Stretching between cities, over terrain, and tunneling through higher terrain, repairing these crumbled rail networks would allow players quick access between cities. (Pre-Elytra, that is.)


    ---Cities taken over by pillagers! It would be pretty irritating to finally spy a city on the horizon- only to notice giant pillager banners hanging from the main keep and off the walls. In addition to housing the usual axe-wielding maniacs, malfunctioning golems could roam the streets. This would be a partly ruined city that houses pillagers, with dark rituals taking place in its center...


    ---Cities would also be a great way of hiding Easter eggs- just make a certain type of room or building rare enough, and who knows what players might find in it. This one is pretty random, but it would be a good way of mixing things up and preventing players from getting bored. Imagine finding a secret jukebox room beneath a villager's house! It would certainly raise questions.


    Additional Concept Art below ~

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on Should other Structures have more variation?

    With 1.14, villages now have multiple different variants depending on which biome they're found in- making them feel more unique and immersive, at least to me. (This isn't to say there aren't still occasional weird problems with village generation, or that villages shouldn't be improved, but that's an entirely different topic.) The consensus seemed to be that the old village structures were nice enough, and an important part of the game's style... but didn't fit with the new additions being made to the game- those structures were designed at a point when developers had to input each block directly into the code.

    Now that villages have been 'modernized,' made to have different variants for each biome, many other structures feel sort of... left out. Of course, there are other issues with structures as well. Consider the desert pyramid- the loot is so overpowered, that you're far better off scouring the desert for temples than raiding a woodland mansion- which is much harder, and provides worse loot. The problem is that if you didn't know how the TNT trap in the pyramid worked... or that it was there in the first place... then the loot would make sense. The pyramid has become outdated in that now everyone knows its secret so well, that there's hardly a player who can't efficiently raid it while avoiding the trap... something I don't think the developers could have accounted for. This is true of all the structures- because they're always generated more or less the same, players don't need to analyze risk and reward like they would in a rouge like game- they know more or less exactly what's needed to make full use of the structure. This is sort of inevitable with such a popular game, but there are some ways to help.


    The point being that there are some issues with NPC structures in Minecraft- not just the structures themselves, but the fundamental system of exploration. Namely, there isn't any reason to explore- which is a shame, because Minecraft is a pretty scenic game- particularly with decent shaders. However, once you've seen one mine shaft, found one pyramid, raided a mansion... well, there really isn't a point in doing it again, save to get more stuff. Not only is this because of the 'you've seen one, you've seen 'em all' mentality, but because there aren't any biome specific resources really worth getting. Games like Skyblock prove this- you can easily survive in a small area, and there isn't any reason to move around.


    TLDR (Summary) ~ Changing structures to have more variation would help to offer incentive for exploration, and improve the aesthetic and atmosphere of the game through relativity simple changes.


    This is getting rather off topic, however- the idea here is pretty simple. I've recently been playing with a Mod called 'Repurposed Structures.' Instead of adding new structures to the game that don't really fit with the Vanilla vibe, it adds different variations of existing structures. (You can find the mod here, it works with Forge and Fabric, and I highly recommend it.) It's pretty simple. In addition to the desert and jungle pyramid, you can find warped, crimson, and basalt pyramids very rarely in the Nether. There are versions of the desert well for each biome, of generally equal rarity- and stumbling upon one is surprisingly atmospheric for such a simple tweak. It adds a version of the Nether fortress made of mossy brick, unique to jungles. The main point being that all of these feel like they should be a part of vanilla. Even these slight modifications in aesthetics and mechanics make these familiar old structures feel fresh, and gives a decent reason for exploration.


    In addition, perhaps a milder version of this idea would simply be to try and improve some of the existing structures- many of which haven't seen any significant changes for years- things that I think most players would agree could use some love. Consider the Strongholds, or Dungeons- 'dungeons' that consist of a single room and a single mob spawner. (Though I have high hopes for more interesting discoveries underground, with the upcoming Caves and Cliffs Update.) As for strongholds, considering that they provide access to the literal End of the game, one would think they would be a bit more difficult to get through.


    To change this, and make things considerably more troublesome for players, consider this: Instead of always generating with a TNT trap, what if the desert pyramid had a chance of generating several different traps/hidden rooms... or a room that appears trapped, but actually isn't? The fact that igloos sometimes generate with hidden basements, and woodland mansions have different room configurations has certainly proved this possible. More extreme extensions of this idea could consist of more complex dungeons, different configurations for ocean temples, etc.


    ...To conclude, on the one hand, I think some (relatively) simple changes like these could offer some much needed enhancements to exploration, as well as the game's aesthetic in general. However, I might also acknowledge that this would be considerably difficult for developers- not in the aspect of programming, but in the fact that it would be rather difficult to change things in a way that long-time players would approve of. That being said, some of the recent updates have certainly shown that Mojang is capable of overhauling outdated systems.

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on End Ore (6th tier weapons and armor on par with netherite, with different benefits.)

    Ores... yes, but not on their own. It would make sense if this came with a large overhaul to the End, similar to the Nether update- but on its own, it doesn't currently fit with gameplay. At least in my opinion.

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on Make cows attack you when you attack them

    Cows are passive mobs- they shouldn't attack things. However, I would agree that hunting for food is far too easy right now. If you injure a cow, other nearby cows should flee. Similarly, hunting things could be made more interesting if animals tried to avoid you more if you weren't sneaking. Right now, getting food is as simple as digging a hole, using food to lure animals into it, and killing them all. ...So no, cows shouldn't attack you, but hunting animals should be harder- at least in higher difficulty levels.

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on Spooky forest biome.

    Fog would definitely be an interesting mechanic and a nice aesthetic- but it does seem like it would be pretty hard to get working, since there really isn't anything like this in the game at the moment. The simplest thing I can think of would be to have fog somehow transition between biomes, (As mentioned), and occur at a certain height above sea level, so that it would occur in valleys. It would also be neat if something like this occurred in other biomes or as a weather event. The tricky part to me would be finding a way for a block to generate fog above or around it. The easiest way, at least to me, seems like it would be having players simply have some sort of fog status effect when on or near the block- however, this would kind of defeat the purpose.

    On a side note, (And a more general note) I just feel like a creepy biome like this would be more suited to the End then a place like the Overworld.

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on Just a kiln

    Yes please! This is really annoying, and would be an elegant solution to the problem. (Edit: I included concept art/more crafting recipe ideas.)

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on Cats really need to be worked on.

    On the one hand I wouldn't mind if there was more incentive to hunt down a cat than scaring off creepers, and little else. ...On the other hand, being a dog person, I guess it kind of figures that they're sort of annoying. If anything, it might be amusing if they were somehow made more unhelpful.

    Posted in: Suggestions
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    posted a message on Copper & Automation ~ How Far Should if Go?

    There's something to be said for an elegant, functional farm- but there are certain aspects of automation in Minecraft that seem a little odd. The most efficient animal farm, for example, consists of a bunch of cows in a hole. Crops can be farmed automatically- but only with the aid of enslaved villagers, who have to be dragged where you want them by means of a boat. Automatic quarries are incredibly complicated, and often require TNT duplication to function.


    This thread is less of an original suggestion, and more of an inquiry into how far automation ought to go, and how it should be balanced. I have played with all of these mechanics before by means of the Quark mod- at least, things along these lines; and they seem, (At least to me), to work fairly well. I've tried to do my best to include pros and cons for each aspect of automation, though I'm sure that these are far from complete.


    Lastly, if new aspects of automation were added, this would be yet another new application for copper. (Some of my previous thoughts included limited use copper tridents, and 'Shulker Turrets,' described in this thread.)



    AUTOMATED PLANTING ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    For awhile, I actually thought that this was part of the game- it just seemed like such an obvious thing to be implemented. The idea is more or less that dispensers should be able to plant seeds on adjacent farmland blocks. I've tried to design farms using this mechanic- and have found, for the most part, that by far the most difficult part of making a fully automatic farm is knowing when to harvest the crops. (A redstone counting circuit can be used, but has trouble accounting for a harvesting cycle that uses water, and all those hoppers tend to be pretty expensive anyways.) As such, I would suggest that when a comparator is hooked up to an observer, it should release a redstone signal of varying strength depending on the maturity of the adjacent crop. (In this manner, individual harvesting nodes could be set up- or a more complex automatic farm in which large harvesting units are hooked up to a smaller single observer node that observes multiple blocks of wheat, in order to detect when the entire system is about ready to harvest.)


    PROS

    Obviously, automatic planting allows essentially unlimited sources of food, along with unlocking all manner of interesting new farm designs. The mechanic is fairly balanced, seeing that you wind up needing a dispenser for every single plot of wheat, along with other redstone circuitry to automate harvesting and replanting. This seems to make a bit more sense than enslaving villagers to work for you, and could result in some pretty unique designs. Automatic farming would be as simple as allowing dispensers to plant seeds- though the actual machinery is rather more difficult to make, requiring a harvesting mechanism, timer circuit, and a replanting system for the seeds. This really just feels like it should already be a part of the game, and would be the easiest to implement. Furthermore, automatic farms would be somewhat balanced in regards to manual farms, since fortune tools would only be used in manual or semiautomatic designs.


    CONS

    The first and most obvious problem with this is that Villager farms wind up being significantly cheaper. You don't need so many dispensers, or hoppers to restock the dispensers. Players wouldn't have any reason to put so much effort into making these systems unless villager mechanics were seriously altered. Such alterations could have significant effects on servers and existing farms. Secondly, unless it is possible for these farms to be fully autonomous, there is still no reason to build them- ultimately, it's quicker and simpler to just make a manual farm, and there still won't be any reason to make an automatic one unless it is completely automatic.



    AUTOMATED BREEDING ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Another interesting mechanic added by Quark is a feeding trough- a block that can be filled with grain or seeds, and can thus be used to automatically breed most livestock, since it can be fed with a hopper. In order to balance it, animals only have a fifty percent chance of entering love mode when fed from a trough. The trough could also be another means of using Copper- and could be crafted using copper bars, stone, and a chest.


    PROS

    ...Once again, this could result in more automatic farms and more essentially unlimited sources of food that would create some unique engineering opportunities and solutions. There really doesn't seem to be much else to say here.


    CONS

    ...And also once again, it's entirely possible that the existing design of 'dump a bunch of cows in a hole and spam the feed button,' would still be significantly more efficient- particularly if players simply don't intend to put the effort into designing such complicated systems.



    AUTOMATED MINING ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Perhaps the most debatable topic is the idea of a means of automatically mining blocks by means of redstone machines. Once again, while this already sort of exists, they're pretty difficult to make unless you know what you're doing, and are willing to use arguably exploitable TNT duplication. The idea is a version of the End Rod that can be used to break blocks when pushed up against them with a piston. Crafted using an end rod, a netherite ingot, and some copper; they would be suitably expensive- seeing as they could be used to create tunnel boring machines, automatic cobblestone generators, automatic treefarms, and other very much end-game machines.


    PROS

    Using these mechanics, advanced players could essentially automate every single aspect of the game. In order to balance it, it would have to be both incredibly end-game, and perhaps made slightly less overpowered. However, if these rods did break over time, or could only mine certain blocks, they would hardly be as useful. Everything from tunnel boring weaponry to highly automated quarrying machines that would allow them to dominate their worlds.


    CONS

    This would be really, really overpowered- there's a reason players can't already make this sort of thing. There isn't much more to say than that; it would be way too easy for players to find new and innovative ways of abusing such a game mechanic, and it would be a nightmare to balance.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    These are just my takes on this topic- Feedback is highly appreciated.

    Posted in: Suggestions
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