• 2

    posted a message on Voxel's Survival World
    Quote from Zerdonex»
    Wow these are great builds!

    Thank you! There's definitely more to come :)

    Alright guys another update. There's not as much done here as in the other updates, but life has been pretty busy as usual. Heck as I'm writing this I have a chemistry quiz tomorrow, I should really be studying haha.

    Inefficiency
    5 November 2014

    Redstoners who have an issue with all things inefficient, please turn away.



    But on to that later. Since the last update, I felt that I really needed better tools. I gathered levels from mining and from the xp grinder and was able to get myself a pretty good sword. I pretty much use this to save on coal for food (although I have a lot of coal already).



    Made the first jump pad! I only found enough slime balls to make this, I wish I could make more. These things are probably the best thing that came into minecraft since the hopper.



    Preparations start on a new project. This is located on the right side of the house, and it will be a pumpkin farm. Now, I wonder why I titled this entry as "Inefficiency?"



    Start of the redstone. This design for the farm I actually thought up myself, but it's definitely not the best one out there. It's not very unique either, a lot of pumpkin farms are structured in a similar way. The redstone can definitely be improved as well.



    After a bit of time I managed to expand the area to outside the mountain and I installed another row of pistons on the other side. Not having slime balls suck, having normal pistons make the pumpkins fly all over the place.



    View of the house from the outside. Definitely starting to see the scale of the whole place, and it's not even remotely close to being finished.



    And here comes the inefficient part.. (as if it isn't inefficient enough). I decided to transport the items from the water stream into the chests using hoppers. I did this because using hoppers I wouldn't be limited to the length of the water stream and I can place the chest practically anywhere I want.



    Another small overview of part of the farm. As for some technical specifications - each row produces 16 pumpkins per harvest, and there will be 3 rows in total so the farm produces 3 x 16 = 48 pumpkins per harvest. It isn't great, but it's definitely enough for what I want to do with the pumpkins.



    Here's a different perspective of the farm. As you can see the other part of the house is in the bottom right. The farm will not be covered, instead I'm planning to have the wall here made out of glass so anyone walking there can see inside. There will also be a door so that I can actually access the farm in the first place.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 7

    posted a message on Voxel's Survival World
    Hey Guys,

    Some of you might know me already from my previous two survival worlds and my building guide. After a rather long break from Minecraft, I decided to come back to the game after I heard about all the things that came out in version 1.8. I had trouble at first; I was not able to keep a world going. Eventually however, I got a seed that is simply too good to pass up. My main goal with this world is to have a large main base that is modern in design. Anyways, with that out of the way let's get started.




    World Settings

    Seed: 75913853097930205
    Biome Weight Scale: 4.00 (You can access this by changing the world type to customized)




    Get Into It
    12 October 2014



    Where I spawned, right on top of a village. Great start, or so it seems. There wasn't anything valuable in the village - no farms, no blacksmith. After looking around, I decided to find a place to settle for the first night.



    Got some things gathered - stone tools, crafting bench, furnace and a small home (read: hole) inside a mountain-side. The view you get when you look outside though... I love the new world customization options.



    Nothing special in here. I do this in most worlds; gather some materials, dig a hole in a mountain, and go mining.



    At the bottom... first diamonds already! This vein contained 4 diamonds I believe. Here, I dug out a 7 x 7 (or 9 x 9 I don't remember exactly) around the bottom staircase to start the temporary mines. When I get the house finished this will change of course.



    Of course, I wanted to start building immediately. However, building requires a lot of materials (especially to build the base that I had in mind). Since a large portion of my modern base will be made out of spruce wood, I have to go find some. On the way, I found this epic mountain.



    These look very interesting. I don't have the most powerful of computers, so I run on around 10 chunks rendered. This make the islands look very ominous and mysterious. I might check them out at a later date.



    Obviously, modern architecture in minecraft requires mass use of hardened clay. Thank god there's a mesa near where I spawned. In my opinion, Mesas are amazing biomes and they shouldn't be destroyed. Therefore to get my clay, I decided to hollow out the mesa itself but keep the outside intact.



    Anyways, back to mining. We need those diamond tools if we want to gather materials more quickly. Digging a few blocks north of my mine I came across this large cave system (with two ravines!).



    My loot after about half an hour of caving. Not so bad for the first session playing after a long break.



    And the building starts! I know this doesn't actually look very good at the moment, but it's just the very beginning of the base. I already designed a large portion of it in creative, and in my opinion, it doesn't look half bad. Opinions are always welcome though.

    Settling Down
    15 October 2014



    We begin by continuing where we left off. All I did was I expanded the original structure, and cut off a small part of the hill. Making the interior should be interesting since I have not made that yet in the creative world.



    Stable food resource! Food is usually the largest problem that I come across at the start of the world, so I make sure I won't have trouble with it in this one.



    Outlining more parts of the structure. This part will be made out of grey stained clay, but I just learned that you can't actually get that in the Mesa. Hmm. I have to find a way to get some bone meal fast then.



    This seed finds new ways to surprise me.



    What the other side looks like right now. This part of the house is very symmetric. It's starting to take shape though.



    Add some glass, and this part already looks somewhat finished. The interior is still very plain of course, but I'm starting to work on that as well.



    A broader view of the previous structure with an extra platform I just added. This part hangs over the edge of the cliff, which creates a pretty cool effect in my opinion.



    Well this is a convenient find. (It's a skeleton spawner if the picture is not clear enough).



    Dress it up a little, make it look somewhat pleasing.



    This was so frustrating. I completely forgot how to make an efficient mob spawner, and I also forgot how to make the lava blade to automatically kill them. I facepalmed a little when I realized that you just have to make the skeletons flow into lava, not dropping them into lava. Oh well, at least I have infinite bones and arrows now.

    Interior Attempt
    19 October 2014



    First thing I did was some more exterior work near the new platform. This part of the house will extend even further. I'm not sure what's inside yet, I haven't exactly thought of it.



    Quick little furnace setup here. I realized how little coal I actually have, I already used almost half of my supply cooking ores, stone and food.



    Some more exterior work here. I extended the whole thing to the side, and added some pillars as markers. Just for an idea to how large the building is, this part is only around 10% of the whole structure.



    Dug out a large portion of the inside. I'm not sure what I'm going to put in here, but perhaps a wheat farm? Or a storage room.



    Now this looks somewhat complete. This is pretty cozy in my opinion, although I haven't built any furniture on it yet.



    Let's head to the nether! I don't really need the quartz but I do need the glowstone and I'm interested what I'm going to see behind there.



    Wow that's not bad at all. I went ahead and explored it, although I didn't found anything too interesting other than a single blaze spawner and some nether wart. I got quite a lot of glowstone though.



    Found something to build in that large space - a bulk storage space. I needed quite a lot of space for stone after all the digging. Notice that I also added some glass to separate the two "rooms".



    And the last thing I did in this entry is the roof. What do you think of this? I'm not sure myself actually. I don't know if it will fit with the rest of the design.

    Enhancements
    28 October 2014



    Let's expand! I added some outline to the structure here, although I wouldn't be working on the outside all that much. I need to get the inside proper first.



    Some lighting ideas. What do you think? I'm not sure about it but I think it looks okay. The stairs behind it will lead to a separate room (not sure what that would be just yet, any ideas?).



    Work on the interior of this part of the house begins. I got really stuck here because I'm not very good at interior designing, so I wasn't sure what to put here.



    Originally I wanted to make a more automated version of the cow farm rather than manual breeding, but it looked really bad placed here so I removed it. That's what the hole is - redstone and space for the cows.



    Started to change the mine to a more permanent fixture. I think this looks pretty nice to drop into the mine. I'm thinking of using jump pads to go up, but I don't know much about slime block mechanics yet. I'm going to look into that first before I start making the pads.



    I love these kind of views, makes the hole look more impressive than it actually is haha.



    After a little bit of branch mining, I got enough levels to enchant a level 30 pick. This is the first thing I got from it. Wanted just the efficiency and unbreaking to be honest because I feel the fortune would be wasted, but oh well. Can't complain.



    Now this is what the interior should look like. I think I was able to put enough detail into the enchanting room but still able to keep it simple and modern. I'm planning to copy this palette throughout the other parts of the house.



    Onto the back, here's a small view into the jump pads going up from the mine. Of course there are no jump pads there yet but there will be soon (ish). To be honest I don't know what I think about it, it doesn't look very nice right now.




    Stay tuned for further updates :)
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 1

    posted a message on Voxel's Survival World
    Quote from Crumpetxxix»
    Your house is really starting to come together. I like it.


    Thanks! I'm having a lot more trouble on the interior though as I haven't planned it out at all haha.

    Quote from bovee»
    The roof in the last picture looks nice, but like you said it doesn't really match. It's to dark compared to the colors you used in the rest of your build.


    Hm, I might consider changing the color of the stained clay. Although I think if I make it a similar colour to everything else it would look too plain. I'll try it out.

    Anyways, another update today. Got quite a lot of things to do for school recently, and just managed to find time to play today.

    Enhancements
    28 October 2014



    Let's expand! I added some outline to the structure here, although I wouldn't be working on the outside all that much. I need to get the inside proper first.



    Some lighting ideas. What do you think? I'm not sure about it but I think it looks okay. The stairs behind it will lead to a separate room (not sure what that would be just yet, any ideas?).



    Work on the interior of this part of the house begins. I got really stuck here because I'm not very good at interior designing, so I wasn't sure what to put here.



    Originally I wanted to make a more automated version of the cow farm rather than manual breeding, but it looked really bad placed here so I removed it. That's what the hole is - redstone and space for the cows.



    Started to change the mine to a more permanent fixture. I think this looks pretty nice to drop into the mine. I'm thinking of using jump pads to go up, but I don't know much about slime block mechanics yet. I'm going to look into that first before I start making the pads.



    I love these kind of views, makes the hole look more impressive than it actually is haha.



    After a little bit of branch mining, I got enough levels to enchant a level 30 pick. This is the first thing I got from it. Wanted just the efficiency and unbreaking to be honest because I feel the fortune would be wasted, but oh well. Can't complain.



    Now this is what the interior should look like. I think I was able to put enough detail into the enchanting room but still able to keep it simple and modern. I'm planning to copy this palette throughout the other parts of the house.



    Onto the back, here's a small view into the jump pads going up from the mine. Of course there are no jump pads there yet but there will be soon (ish). To be honest I don't know what I think about it, it doesn't look very nice right now.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 2

    posted a message on Voxel's Survival World
    Another update today. Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel! just came out so updates might be a little slow for a little bit haha.

    Interior Attempt
    19 October 2014



    First thing I did was some more exterior work near the new platform. This part of the house will extend even further. I'm not sure what's inside yet, I haven't exactly thought of it.



    Quick little furnace setup here. I realized how little coal I actually have, I already used almost half of my supply cooking ores, stone and food.



    Some more exterior work here. I extended the whole thing to the side, and added some pillars as markers. Just for an idea to how large the building is, this part is only around 10% of the whole structure.



    Dug out a large portion of the inside. I'm not sure what I'm going to put in here, but perhaps a wheat farm? Or a storage room.



    Now this looks somewhat complete. This is pretty cozy in my opinion, although I haven't built any furniture on it yet.



    Let's head to the nether! I don't really need the quartz but I do need the glowstone and I'm interested what I'm going to see behind there.



    Wow that's not bad at all. I went ahead and explored it, although I didn't found anything too interesting other than a single blaze spawner and some nether wart. I got quite a lot of glowstone though.



    Found something to build in that large space - a bulk storage space. I needed quite a lot of space for stone after all the digging. Notice that I also added some glass to separate the two "rooms".



    And the last thing I did in this entry is the roof. What do you think of this? I'm not sure myself actually. I don't know if it will fit with the rest of the design.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 232

    posted a message on Voxel's Guide To Building
    Hey guys, I've decided to create a guide to building just for fun and also to help out the community. I've seen many other guides here, but most of them only cover the basics (using different materials and different shapes). I will cover those topics also, but I will also cover the other more advanced parts of building - different biomes, working with terrain and most importantly, detail in structures.



    The Basics

    Starting Home

    First of all, let's start with the bane of all builders; what I'm sure every minecrafter has ever constructed in their lifetime. The starting home.



    It's simple, it's easy to build and it does what it's supposed to do pretty well - to protect the player. The only issue is, it's a massive eyesore. So let's start working on it.



    First thing that we can do is add some windows. Things are starting to look a little bit better. I chose glass panes over glass blocks because they give a little bit more depth. It's those little things that makes buildings look just that much better.



    Putting block variants drastically improves how the good the building looks. I decided to use oak logs as in my opinion it looks pretty good with stone brick and glass.



    Roofs are generally the same with buildings in that there has to be block variations as well. Here, I used stone brick as the outer border and oak wood in the middle. However, I'm not a big fan of this kind of roof, but I'll get to that later.



    Alright this might appear like a big jump but I'll try to explain it the best I can. A lot of you might think that "oh, the roof is there, therefore it's complete". But it's far from that. You see, the detail is where it's at. I'll get into detail further on, but I'll explain what I changed to the house here. I changed the blocks between the panes to stairs, and I also added horizontal log blocks in between the main supports. I also added fences to further increase the look of stability.

    And there we have it, a good looking starter home which started off as a small cube that every single minecrafter despises.

    Block Variations and Block Palettes

    Before you even begin to build, you have to take into consideration the blocks that you will use. Of course, one of the number one rules is to avoid using just one block. Here I prepared 9 different block palettes. Each palette has 2 blocks that compliment each other, and one block that contrasts the other two.



    With that in mind, here are some wall designs that are based off these palettes.





    At this point it should be rather clear that each of these different palettes represent different building themes. For example, the stone brick - oak combination represents medieval/fantasy while the snow - ice combo represents a more modern style. Of course, all this is simplified and you can certainly have more than 3 blocks in a palette.

    My main point is, it is very important to have a block palette in mind before you start building something. This allows you to stick to a certain theme and also avoids having too many or too little colours.

    Depth and Detail

    Depth and detailing is quite an important part in building, and what I find a lot of minecrafters lack. Here is a simple wall. Again, just like the starter house, it serves it's purpose well. But again, it is still rather an eyesore.



    So what exactly do we have to do to make this structure much more aesthetically pleasing?



    First of all, add columns that divide the wall into several different sections. This insets the cobble wall backwards, adding an idea of depth.



    Stairs and half slabs make for great detail blocks. They allow much more shapes to be created instead of just simple cubes. Here, I added stairs for the bottom of the columns and half slabs to connect the columns together. This creates a border around the cobble wall.



    Here I showcase several different blocks to add further detail and depth. These include, but not limited to, fences, leaves and sideways - facing logs. I also added slabs in between to act as windows or shooting holes, depending on how you look at it.



    For the finishing touches, I added even more stairs to make the whole wall look more sturdy. I added fences on top for a possibility of a walkway.

    Voila! There we have it. A wall with a lot of depth and detail, and it all started with a simple 3 high cobblestone wall.

    Tips and Tricks

    So what if you want to modify your buildings but the buildings just so happen to not be a wall? Here are some simple tips and tricks to modify your building/home.

    Inset the blocks and use foliage to your advantage.



    The wall on the left is the normal building, and the one on the right is the modified one. I not only inset the wall, but I also added a small "roof" to the window, combined with the fences. I also added several plants on both sides of the window.

    Try to put in as much detail as possible.



    Here is a small roof detail, preferably on smaller houses. On larger houses, you can put in a full fledged attic. It is pretty simple - cut away a portion of the roof, add some fences and also some glass.



    Another small detail. To do this, extend the uppermost block of the roof a couple of blocks, and place an upward facing log at the very end. Put a slab on top of it and place some fences below it. Place a glowstone block, surround it with trapdoors and place a slab below it.

    Curves make the structure seem to 'flow' more smoothly.



    In this small mock up structure, I used a variety of stairs, slabs and fences to make the building 'flow' more smoothly. The fences make the edges seem like it is a slight curve, instead of a sharp ~90 degree angle. The stairs below the second set of logs makes the wall look like it is one line, instead of two lines separated by one block.

    Arches, Curves and Circles

    Adding arches, curves and circles into your buildings allow a lot of extra detail and shapes to be made. However, building curves in a game full of squares is indeed rather difficult. One rule to help make things easier is something I call the 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 rule.



    As you can see in the picture above, there are several different sections in an arch. Every section is one block smaller in length than the previous section. Of course, the different sections can be the same length, but a section cannot be larger in length than the one before. This rule is there so that the arch makes sense. With that in mind, here are several examples of arches used in building.



    I've said beforehand that I am not a big fan of the classic 45 degree roof. This is because that in my opinion, it looks flat and it doesn't offer that much shape. Above is an alternative version for a roof. As you can see, it follows the guidelines of an arch but in the opposite way. The roof starts with 1 block, then another, then 2 blocks, then 2 blocks.



    Here, I used the rule of arches I mentioned earlier to create the supports in the bridge. As you can see, I used the same principle. It starts at 3 blocks at the bottom, then 2, then 1. I then repeat this 3 times to create the supports shown.

    Circles

    Circles follow the same principles as arches, but repeated 4x over. Using this, it is quite easy to build a circle without the use of a guide. Here are several circles that I prepared beforehand, ranging from smallest to largest.



    To create your circle, you have to start from the center. Then, create the 4 different edges of the circle. In the picture above, it's either 3 or 5 blocks. This is the start of the first arch. Then, start using the arch principle I mentioned earlier. Experiment with different lengths to create the circle.

    At the first circle, there is only 1 block, so there isn't exactly a pattern forming. On the second circle however, the pattern is 1-1. On the third circle, the pattern is 2-1-2. The fourth circle, 2-2-2-2. See how this works?

    Here are some examples to use circles as decoration in your buildings.



    Here's a design of a watermill using a 15 block diameter circle. I have to admit this is not something I made myself, but instead it's a design off lynchyinc's steamshire farm. Nevertheless, he used logs to frame the entire structure together, and also fences to add some necessary detail.



    Here's another structure involving the use of circles. It could be used as a foundation for a castle tower, a normal watch tower, or even a corner of a wall. Nevertheless, this is a 9 block diameter circle extended upwards with some extra detail.

    Building with Terrain

    There is no point in learning a lot about building but not knowing where to put it. I find that a lot of people here tend to just level the land, creating an empty canvas to build their structure. The thing is, terrain, if used correctly, creates more shapes, detail and is overall more aesthetically pleasing. One rule I like to follow is build with the terrain, not against it. For example, here we have a mountain biome.



    Now, we have to analyse it. See what building would go where, what structure would fit in this area etc.



    Here I labeled out several different areas that I find stand out in the mountain biome. We have a small isolated piece of land to the bottom right, and a small flat-ish area to the left. There's a small hill that has to be partially improved, but would make for a good looking 2-story structure. The small slope at the top left has possibilities for a stair to the summit.



    Now, let's start with a bridge. Here, you can see I used the arch principle I mentioned earlier, upside down. This bridge has a pattern of 2 - 3 - 3 - 4.



    I stamped a building on the flat piece of land I mentioned earlier. I decided not to show you guys the construction process, as I already covered that previously. This building doesn't use any aspects of the terrain as it was all flat.



    Here, I highlighted the several different floors of the secondary structure. You can see how I used the terrain to my advantage on this building. On the smaller ledge I used half slabs. On the steeper side, I will use stairs.



    While working on the structure here's one thing that you guys might encounter often. The supports are off by one side and it doesn't look natural if you extend the terrain/support out. So how to fix it?



    It is in fact pretty simple. Place an upside down staircase below the supports. The logs between are optional, but I think it looks nice and adds a little bit of texture.





    And here is the completed structure just for completion's sake. Here you can see the tips I mentioned earlier at use. The roof uses the arch principle, and the walls use some tricks from the depth and detail section.





    Here are some interior pics, showing how I mold the structure around the land. You can see the main staircase that leads to the second floor and also the smaller staircase that leads to another smaller room.

    But what if you want to decorate the terrain even further? Here are two things that I added that also compliments the terrain.



    Here's a small path that follows the contours of the terrain hidden behind the house. You can use this to lead up to the summit etc.



    A small piston door that can lead to some farms, a tunnel, an underground base, whatever.



    And here's a finished view of everything. For those of you who might wanna experiment with the same terrain, or just want a cool mountain place to build/start a survival world, here are the seed and coordinates.

    Seed - 1716790406808994629
    Co-ordinates - X: -139 Z: 438



    Building with Biomes

    First of all, a small disclaimer before I begin. This section would mostly discuss my favourite block palettes in combination with a specific biome, as well as a rather small showcase of the style and structure of the things that I will make in that specific biome. With that in my mind, let's begin.

    Forests

    Whenever I see a forest, I just see it as a perfect spot to build something medieval/fantasy/steampunk. So that's exactly the theme that I'll be going for in this specific section of the guide. First of all, let's start with the block palette that we'll be using.



    The 3 blocks on the left are the blocks that compliments each other, and the 3 blocks on the right are the blocks that contrast each other.



    Here's the forest that we'll be working with. I chose it because there's a large rock formation in the middle that would be rather interesting to work with.



    ...and let's stamp a building to the side of the rock. Note how I used the tips I mentioned in this structure. Both in the roof and in the walls.



    Every structure/village/city etc. requires some form of lighting. Here, I used fire as a light source to show a more medieval theme.



    To the side of the structure I added some aqueducts. These create an interesting archway over the path and also adds some more detail.



    Note the small details. I used item frames with a half slab to show a handle for the torches.



    And some more buildings. I added an extra lantern to the side of it as well as a "lantern handle" that goes off the roof of the building.



    To the other side, we're gonna use the terrain for our advantage. I added another aqueduct, this time slightly simpler. Also to the left you can see some stairs that follow the contours of the aforementioned rock.



    At the top, I added a well that shows where the water comes from and also some more lanterns.



    Now, where will the village gain any currency? Here I installed a market using the hardened clay blocks. We can make this actually work by using a hopper below the chest connected to a small sorting system that in turn connects to a dropper.



    I added another market stall with some storage behind it.



    And here we are. A small medieval outpost, hidden in the forest by a large natural rock formation. I have to give credit to Novv from Planet Minecraft for the inspiration on the buildings.

    Jungles

    Jungles are a little bit more complicated to work with, mostly because of the rough terrain at the bottom as well as at the canopies. I find that a lot of treehouses made in minecraft are just boxes placed on top of the trees, which in my opinion is probably one of the biggest eyesores ever. Nevertheless, here's the jungle we'll be working with. (Note, this is the same world as the one with the medieval outpost in the previous section).



    You can see where I started working at the top, where the wooden planks are. That's the specific section we'll be using.



    The block palette, you'll see later on that I won't be using the stone bricks and clay though.



    First thing that I did was to scatter wooden planks across the top of the jungle tree. This creates some more texture and instantly makes the floor look "stable". I also added railings using sideways jungle logs as well as jungle leaves. This also makes it look more 'natural'. I didn't show it previously but there is a small ledge at the back where I installed a staircase. This is another example of using the natural terrain to your advantage.



    The main lighting source we will use in this is glowstone, hidden with jungle leaves.



    Time to expand this even further. On the back side I installed a small staircase following the contours of the jungle tree.



    Here there are two jungle trees at close proximity, so I connected them together and created a floor.



    There's another jungle tree to the right, so I connected the two paths together with a bridge.



    With the flat canopy I decided to create a building on top of it. I also show how to create a structure on top of jungles without making it look ugly.



    The finished structure. As you can see, I used leaves as the roof and I also used half slabs as the walls, to make it look more 'open'.




    Some of the interior pics. The table with the flower pot and the cactus was posted by another user here. The name escapes me at the moment, sorry about that.



    Now let's further expand this path. Since I made this with survival in mind, I placed some jungle pillars with cocoa beans - could be used as a farm in survival mode.



    There are a bunch of jungle trees here, so I decided to just connect them all together to make one large floor.



    Starting on the house/building to be built on top of this massive canopy. It's more modern with the columns and the glass panes.



    Just a picture of the design of the side wall. As you can see I used open fence gates to support the half slab.



    Extended the floor outwards as there is a small one block difference to the bottom tree. This will become a form of balcony.




    Several progress pictures. As you can see, I used the arch principle here but in a smaller case to make the entrance to the balcony. The roof is also made out of leaves and are scattered and asymmetrical; thus making it look more natural.



    There was a large tree of about equal height to the other side of the main entrance so I created a 'skywalk' to connect the two together.



    And on the other side I used the extra jungle tree to create a small cow farm. Sure, it's not that humane but ah well.



    Another small raise calls for another small staircase.



    The flat rooftop means I will build another structure there. Again, as I'm focusing this to be made in survival mode, this structure will be a small bedroom.




    Several more progress pictures. As you can see, it is the same principle and theme as before, you should be able to get the hang of it by now.




    And here are some interior pictures! I will make an interior section further on.



    Back to the other side now. If you look closely there's another jungle tree on the other side.



    And connected!



    Of course, all bases need some form of storage system. Here's the start of one.



    And done!



    Here's a look from the outside. I used half slabs instead of full blocks for another feel of open space.



    And finally, a bird's eye view of the entire outpost. I hoped that this section helped you with building in the jungle, as it is a really awesome place to build in. The jungle has a multitude of different levels, which force creativity and shape instead of boxes. So with this, I hope to eradicate the amount of square, cube treehouses.

    Desert

    Deserts are like plains - large empty flats. Generally these kind of terrain is very boring; many others would prefer extreme hills over deserts, for example. But, deserts can be a place to stray away from the usual medieval style builds. I say two styles fit perfectly for deserts - middle eastern and modern. Notice how both of these styles use a LOT of sandstone; the perfect block for desert builds.



    The block palette. Again, this follows the the core of several blocks that compliment each other, and several blocks that contrast.



    We're going for a middle-eastern theme here, as the modern style will be focused on more in the plains. So to start of things, make a few columns.



    I apologize that I did not capture enough pictures in between this picture and the one before. My main point is, I extended the columns to make it 3 blocks thick. I also added some walls in the inside as well as some stairs as the roof. These stairs also add some curvature.



    Now let's start adding a small room/patio. I actually tried to follow the contours a little bit here by making it go down a step.



    Pro tip - buttons and fences add quite a lot of detail to buildings, especially sandstone ones.



    It's rather tough to see in this picture, but what I did was I added several columns extending to the side; filled it with glass in between and add the roof you see here. I will eventually change this later though.



    Add the floors. I wasn't planning to use hardened clay at all in this guide, but I did anyway. I took inspiration from the desert temples that naturally generate already.



    Now simply cover the entire thing up and curve the edges a little bit.



    Overall view of what things look like at the moment. You can see the second floor balcony overlooking everything else there, as well as the yellow hardened clay on top of the small room.



    For the entrance, use the technique similar to the one I used for the forest roads. Scatter similar looking blocks together to create a path.



    Now to finish things up. I added some hardened clay at the very bottom floor similar in pattern to the small room we made earlier. I also extended some of the walls.



    Copy the design again to the second floor, and create the walls. I originally wanted the structure to be more covered up, but it looked better open like this.



    Add the roof. It's open again here, as those blocks are only half-slabs; placing glass blocks would deter how it looks from the outside by quite a bit.



    And the finished product!

    Savanna

    So, Savanna. When they were first introduced, the trees were just jungle trees and there wasn't really any materials that fit well with them. Then, Dinnerbone introduced the two new wood types - dark oak and acacia wood. Funnily enough, these two types of wood are perfect for the Savanna. But how about theme? Well scroll down and find out.



    Here's a Savanna about 4000 blocks away from my main base in my survival world. What I did was I created a new world with the same seed, and used AMIDST to locate a Savanna M biome.



    Fast forward a tiny bit, and here we have two different houses. If the style isn't particularly clear, it's steampunk. You can also see the different block types that I used here. The columns are dark oak wood; the roof is made out of dark oak planks; the walls are mostly acacia wood and the glass are blue stained glass.



    Here's a closer view of the other house. You can sort of see the steampunk influence in this build. There is a gear next to the house that acts as a sort-of water mill. The shape of the structure itself is very unconventional, and the roof is arched in the way that I showed in the circles section of this guide.



    Let's begin creating a new house. First of all, I create a rectangle that has odd dimensions, i.e. length and width of odd numbers. In this case, 9 x 7. Then I placed wooden columns every other block.



    This is quite a jump, but I'll try to explain it. First, I expanded the original rectangle by a block on both sides. Then, I create another rectangle next to it also with odd dimensions. Afterwards I placed wooden columns in the same fashion as before and placed a roof.



    Just a look from the front, you can see how I incorporate the acacia wood and the blue stained glass into the build.



    I expanded the rectangle outwards again by a block on both sides, so it is now 2 blocks more than the original rectangle (on both sides). I placed the wooden columns and then begin work on the roof. Note how this roof is constructed - it is an upside-down arch.



    On the other side is an example of how you can decorate your wall. This is just one of the ways, there are many other possible ways out there. You can put shrubs, large windows, lamps, whatever.



    Anyways, I filled in the roof with dark oak planks and stairs, and then added these large "buttresses" (not sure what word to use here) one block off the stone brick border.



    Sometimes, if there are large sections of a roof that is completely blank, I add a circular window. They're pointless, but whatever. They look good.



    Overview of what the house looks like. You can also see that I added a chimney (the stone brick with the anvil on top) and added leaves around the house to add some more detail.



    Let's add some more components to emphasize this steampunk theme. Here, I added a small railway. In survival, I use a similar-looking railway to transport items from a collection area to a storage room.




    Aqueducts are always awesome. Here, they're pointless. They look pretty damn good but they don't actually serve any purpose. In survival, you can use this as an item transport system (which I do) or even to transport a water source for a farm.



    Here's an overview image of what we've built in the Savanna biome.



    Interior Design

    Basics

    What exactly do we have to do to decorate the interior of a structure? There isn't necessarily a step by step process to follow, as decorating a building is entirely relative to the building itself. So let's use some examples.



    Here we have a small house, built in the forest part of the building with biomes section above. I purposely made the house empty so that I can build it here.



    Floors. Don't just jump in into the little chairs and cabinets, make some floors first. Stairs are pretty difficult to incorporate most of the time, but here I just used a small one wide staircase.



    Start decorating. I'll go more into depth in the next section about different kinds of furniture, but keep note that detail is incredibly important in furniture. The more, the better.



    Another picture of the first floor. Note the shrub in the corner and the carpet in the middle, surrounding the glowstone. I also added some cracks on the floor using different orientations of stairs.



    An enchanting station at the top floor. This one is directly connected to the roof, making the transitions smoother per say using the hardened clay.



    And the bed, with a lot of books surrounding it. I find this fits the fantasy theme well, but not so much so for other themes.

    Interior design has a lot of similarities with building in general. Detail is a necessity, and themes and block palettes are things that we also have to keep in mind.



    Building with Function

    Basics

    I get asked now and then about if I prefer building things to function well, or building things to look good. The thing is, it's not difficult at all to make things that are both of these things combined. A lot of people like to call this rule as form follows function.

    To get started, let's choose a random machine; say, TangoTek's automatic brewing setup. This is an amazing design, and one I will probably use in my world as well. So let's get started trying to make this thing looking good.



    First of all, we have to know what are the parameters. As in, what needs to be there and what doesn't need to be there. In this case the parameters set are rather simple.
    • All redstone lamps have to be visible
    • All chests have to be visible and accesible
    • All levers have to be accessible
    • All droppers accessible
    • Item frames not need to be there, but is recommended
    • Water does not need to be where it is
    With all the parameters known, let's get started.



    Of course, a palette has to be set. Since I want to make this in my own world, I use a palette that is commonly used in my main base. Note this can be changed later on.



    First of all I changed the iron blocks to the palette that I am using. I placed half slabs below the redstone lamps for more shape. I used slabs here to follow the parameters that I set above.



    I'll attempt to explain everything I did here. First of all, I pretty much replaced all of the previous blocks to blocks in my palette. As you can see things are already looking great just by replacing the blocks. However, instead of stairs I placed solid blocks. I then place half slabs below those blocks. All of the blocks I placed here follows the parameters I set above.



    Here it is clear that I moved one part of the machine - the water source. This is stated in one of the parameters above - the water does not need to be where it is. Because of that I moved the water to a place that appears to be more aesthetically pleasing.



    Detail can also be implemented. Here's a small fence wall with spruce leaves behind it.



    Overview of everything. This is a very simple example of how form follows function is implemented. It also goes to show how not everything that is complicated has to look bad. As long as the parameters are set, it is possible to make everything look great.



    TO DO LIST

    Arches, Curves and Circles
    Building with Terrain
    Building in Biomes
    Interior Design

    Thank you for reading until the end, I hope I helped some of you improve your building skills, and I hope some of you can use this guide as a form of inspiration :)

    Also, please if any of you have any suggestions or any form of criticism, don't be afraid to say it. I am aiming for this guide to be most complete, so I appreciate anything you guys have to say.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 5

    posted a message on Voxel's Guide To Building
    Building with Biomes - Savanna
    21 February 2014

    So, Savanna. When they were first introduced, the trees were just jungle trees and there wasn't really any materials that fit well with them. Then, Dinnerbone introduced the two new wood types - dark oak and acacia wood. Funnily enough, these two types of wood are perfect for the Savanna. But how about theme? Well scroll down and find out.



    Here's a Savanna about 4000 blocks away from my main base in my survival world. What I did was I created a new world with the same seed, and used AMIDST to locate a Savanna M biome.



    Fast forward a tiny bit, and here we have two different houses. If the style isn't particularly clear, it's steampunk. You can also see the different block types that I used here. The columns are dark oak wood; the roof is made out of dark oak planks; the walls are mostly acacia wood and the glass are blue stained glass.



    Here's a closer view of the other house. You can sort of see the steampunk influence in this build. There is a gear next to the house that acts as a sort-of water mill. The shape of the structure itself is very unconventional, and the roof is arched in the way that I showed in the circles section of this guide.



    Let's begin creating a new house. First of all, I create a rectangle that has odd dimensions, i.e. length and width of odd numbers. In this case, 9 x 7. Then I placed wooden columns every other block.



    This is quite a jump, but I'll try to explain it. First, I expanded the original rectangle by a block on both sides. Then, I create another rectangle next to it also with odd dimensions. Afterwards I placed wooden columns in the same fashion as before and placed a roof.



    Just a look from the front, you can see how I incorporate the acacia wood and the blue stained glass into the build.



    I expanded the rectangle outwards again by a block on both sides, so it is now 2 blocks more than the original rectangle (on both sides). I placed the wooden columns and then begin work on the roof. Note how this roof is constructed - it is an upside-down arch.



    On the other side is an example of how you can decorate your wall. This is just one of the ways, there are many other possible ways out there. You can put shrubs, large windows, lamps, whatever.



    Anyways, I filled in the roof with dark oak planks and stairs, and then added these large "buttresses" (not sure what word to use here) one block off the stone brick border.



    Sometimes, if there are large sections of a roof that is completely blank, I add a circular window. They're pointless, but whatever. They look good.



    Overview of what the house looks like. You can also see that I added a chimney (the stone brick with the anvil on top) and added leaves around the house to add some more detail.



    Let's add some more components to emphasize this steampunk theme. Here, I added a small railway. In survival, I use a similar-looking railway to transport items from a collection area to a storage room.




    Aqueducts are always awesome. Here, they're pointless. They look pretty damn good but they don't actually serve any purpose. In survival, you can use this as an item transport system (which I do) or even to transport a water source for a farm.



    Here's an overview image of what we've built in the Savanna biome.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 2

    posted a message on Voxel's Guide To Building
    Alright I finally got an updated prepared and ready to upload, but my internet is rather slow right now. Perks of living in a third world country I suppose.

    Nevertheless, an update should come out soon, whenever my internet is not making me rip my hairs out.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 1

    posted a message on Voxel's Guide To Building
    Quote from cooldude1128

    Hey. Still here, waiting for an update. Is it coming?


    Sorry for the constant delays :(

    I haven't touched minecraft since I made that post. This week has been rather busy for me IRL. I can't say for sure when I will have time, but I promise I will post an update soon-ish.

    Sorry guys.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 1

    posted a message on A World of Magick & Machines - A Survival Journal!
    This journal is very interesting for me as someone who doesn't touch much mods, especially those that modify the game to this caliber. It's very unique in that way, and I like that.

    I lurk this topic often actually, but finally decided to post something especially since you comment on my topic kinda often too.

    Cheers :)
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 58

    posted a message on Journal of a NEW Survival World
    With the first 1.7 snapshot out (which also so happens to include the new terrain), I decided to create a new world. In this world, I aim to fix the mistakes I made in my past world (which some of you may already know about). This world will be on ultra hardcore mode until I defeat the wither. With all that said and done, let's get started.

    Before we begin, this is the seed that I will be using for this world.
    -6645415144808498190 (All settings are default, use only with 13w36a and above versions)



    A Slow Start
    September 7, 2013



    (I had no idea the F2 key would also show the fraps fps number, so sorry about that). Nevertheless, here's the place I spawned in. As you can see, the witch hut is directly in front of me.



    Just getting the basics together, decided to use the witch hut as a temporary house.




    Gathered some food, as well as started to dig out a small mine right next to the hut.



    First diamond vein! That was about 6 diamonds in total I believe. I lost a couple hearts as well because of surprise gravel and a spider. Ah well, gold's not too tough to find.



    At the bottom there's a cave. I explored it a bit, turns out it's much larger than I thought. I closed it and went back to mining.



    Really needed more food, so I took some cows from the savanna nearby.



    Overall look of what the place looks like after the first session. Not too bad, 6 diamonds, proper food, etc.

    The Hobbit Hole
    September 9, 2013



    Enchanting table! It's ridiculously easy to get levels now, but it's pretty tough to get the leather for the bookcases in the first place. So I suppose I won't have maximum enchants that soon.



    Getting ready to build, I set up a small cactus farm to produce dye for the hardened clay.



    Made up a nether portal just to check out what the nether will look like on the other side.



    ...next to nothing, really.



    Darn, there's a lot of caves down there - pretty much means there's a lot of work I have to do.



    Time to start the first build. Needed a small place to live other than the witch hut, so I took some inspiration from hobbit holes.



    A small piece of detail - tripwire hooks as coat hangers.



    A proper bedroom with a nice view outside and more chests for organization. I can finally store all these blocks that I've only been keeping in my inventory.



    On the other side we have a small work table. (Note, the new orchids look amazing on the small clay pots).



    Through the small door to the left is a furnace room, with some more storage chests. I also use bricks for the floor for a change.



    And the main 'room'. We have a small table to the left that will eventually house the brewing stand that I'll hopefully get next update. As you can see I also moved the enchanting table here.

    Note that I also died during (burned, fell in lava but managed to climb back out during branch mining) this update, but the screenshot I took was terrible - a small blue-ish tint that looked horrible. On the other hand, I also ate 3 golden apples thus far.

    Melon Search
    September 11, 2013



    We're back in the nether again, an this time we're on a quest to gather up potion ingredients. Of course the basics of a brewery require nether wart and blaze rods - both incredibly difficult to acquire. After creating a treacherous cobblestone path, I found the fortress I was looking for.



    A bunch of fall damage later, I managed to dig in the fortress. Before we explore further though, we need proper gear. I stored all my things and killed myself to return to full health (is that cheating to you guys?)and geared up to look for the ingredients.



    Wow finally. Nether wart. There are two chambers of this stuff though, yielding me about 40 pieces of wart in total.



    Blazes hurt a lot. Furthermore, the first 3 that I killed didn't even drop a single rod. This one was either the fourth or the fifth blaze I killed.



    Back home, mostly intact. Finally able to create a brewing station, but we're missing one key ingredient (for healing pots that is). Melons.



    Using a small x-ray machine by exploiting a trick with redstone blocks and fences, I managed to find a mineshaft rather close to my base. This is the first thing I see when I dug down to the area.



    First spawner! I didn't capture most of the caving experience because it was mostly stress, panic and hectic placement of blocks to run away from those little cave spiders.



    About an hour later and ~5 chests later I'm finally able to find melon seeds. Note I ate ~3 golden apples and died about twice in that period of time.



    Healing potions! That was a successful trip, albeit a rather insanely difficult one. Ultra-hardcore mode is really just a whole 'nother level.

    Automation
    September 15, 2013



    Time to start some proper automation, as the area will be the main farming district anyway. To start with, I've decided to go with a melon and pumpkin tower.



    The redstone below it. Originally I wanted to use a daylight sensor to create a pulse everytime it turns nighttime. It turns out however, that the redstone needed to turn a permanent signal into a pulse is larger than creating an ordinary hopper clock - so that's what I did. I installed a hopper clock later on with 4 stacks of blocks inside it. (Also note I've been using a texture pack with smooth glass).



    Building up the layers. I forgot to mention that the design is originally by xisumavoid, but I edited it a little bit so it's not a 1-1 copy.



    The farm doesn't output much with just 5 layers, but it should do for now.



    Creating the aesthetics. I wanted to go for a different style than my previous builds, but still maintain a proper block palette that fits the swamp. So, here it is. A more modern touch but with the clay-log-wood core still in place.



    A look from the side. Notice I also use leaves at the bottom to add a bit more detail.



    Another picture from the front. Again, it's a similar palette but a different style.



    With that tower done, I decided to make another tower. Same design, but another layer to make it a bit taller.



    The redstone below the tower. This time I used a hopper clock pretty much the same as the one used on the other tower. It's only different by location.



    Just a great picture from the trapdoor that leads to the redstone of the second tower. I'm not done with the aesthetics yet, but I believe I should put out an update anyway.

    A little bit of Everywhere
    25 September, 2013



    To begin with, a picture of what the base currently looks like. If you look closely at the bottom there are small paths, as well as lamp posts. I aim to make the spawn base have this general design.



    Finally decided to go and dismantled the witch hut. I want to get this up and running as fast as possible, so that I can go and build everything else around the witch farm itself.



    This farm design is different from the last one I used - it is rather more efficient, but it does use quite a bit more resources (read - pistons). It doesn't use as much hoppers as the one before though. The design is by JL2579.



    You have no idea how happy I was when I saw this little guy spawn. I thought that my farm broke cause I accidentaly opened it in 1.6.2, but it seems not to be the case.



    ..and the bottom portion is finished. It's rather bulky, which is why I decided to build this first. Since you can't move a witch hut, I decide to build all of the other farms around it, making it the center piece of the base.



    Of course, we need tripwire for this farm. I need quite a bit of string for it too, it has to connect from one side to the other entirely, which I believe is about 15-16 blocks. Multiply this twice and to the side, and that equals a hell of a lot of string.



    What it looks like right now. I do plan to pretty it up later on, but first I have to make the stack of hoppers required to be at the bottom of the farm. It's nothing in my old world, but in this world, it's about half of my iron supply.

    Unimpressed
    October 3, 2013



    There goes my iron supply. I had about 3 iron left after all that. I did cave a bit later though, and got 4-5 stacks from that alone.



    Even the bottom part needs some form of decoration.



    What the collection room looks like. I decided to go and use the theme of quartz, red stained clay and spruce wood, just as a challenge for myself. I don't use modern palettes often, so this is a first for me I suppose.



    At the very top. You can see the spawner on the right as well as a larger-than-usual nether portal on the left. It's connected directly through a short nether walk to my main base.



    On other news, the witch farm is pretty close to being complete - the roof is probably the only major thing left to build. Note that I still have to do a lot of lighting up the area and caving.

    Woo, Progress!
    October 17, 2013



    I didn't want the ceiling of the witch farm to be this ugly square - after all, it is the center of spawn anyway. So, a circle will suffice. It is rather massive though.



    Another perspective, I think just the circle outline looks good from afar.



    Marked, filled in, flooded.



    With the entire thing being filled in, it is rather gloomy on the inside with the lights turned off. But that is exactly what we wanted. I forgot to take pictures in between, sorry about that.



    Right below I did something different to save a bit on hoppers. Water streams lead the witches to a smaller hole in the middle.



    The bottom section is the usual, with half slabs covering up hoppers connected to a chest. This of course is temporary and a storage system will be implemented later on.



    I also worked on some of the aesthetics. I will not cover up the entire witch farm of course, but I will put up some 'pillars' per say.



    I think the light switch looks pretty good too.



    In other news, I needed to connect the hobbit hole with the main path through an underwater tunnel. This is because the top portion is below the roof of the farm and therefore must eventually be removed.



    Another picture of the tunnel, all a work in progress of course.

    Elevators, among other things.
    November 2, 2013



    After making the light switch I had no proper way of going there by foot. So, I made a walkway (at least the start of one).



    Fenced, boarded up and fit with lights.



    It turns out a massive section of my house was under the roof of the witch farm, and that's a no-go. Therefore I removed the hill first, exposing my house fully.



    Redesigned a lot of it - destroyed large portions of the old staircase and the bulk chests at the bottom. Also removed one small room at the top.



    With the whole thing exposed I had to design an exterior for the structure. This is what I came up with using the all new stained glass.



    It actually feels even cozier on the inside.



    The finished product. I think it looks great, the leaves add a lot of detail into the building as well as the black stained glass.



    Other than digging down to the area, there was no proper way to get to the chest at the bottom of the witch farm either. Time for an elevator.





    This is a design by MumboJumbo. It's very simple as it doesn't even require any repeaters on the redstone. It works by placing a redstone block next to the pistons and a solid block on top of it. Step on the solid block, press the button and you're on your way up.




    The entrance to the witch collection area. It has the same colour scheme as the spider farm.



    At the edge of the walkway on the outside, i placed a bridge. Not too sure how it looks at the moment to be honest.



    On this small patch of land I want to place my villager breeding cells. However, let's get into some vegetation first. Here I extended the land a little bit by placing a small walkway.




    My first ever custom tree. I based this off one I found on planet minecraft, but not too sure how it looks still. The leaves look rather awkward.



    As a bonus, I found a mesa biome! Look at the coordinates. It's very very far from my home base. However, I did make a portal and connect the two together. It still takes two minutes with speed II potions to get there from my spawn though.



    To get you an idea of how far this actually is, here's the map in AMIDST. The coordinates shown are in 1024 block increments.

    Completing End Game Goals
    November 13, 2013

    Continuing with the automation in the area, an infinite villager system has been constructed. It's a design by TangoTek, and is probably the most famous infinite villager cell out there.


    TangoTek's Villager System

    The system consists of 6 doors at the bottom that has one villager, and at least two villagers on top. The series of pistons and redstone is only there to transfer the baby villagers to the other side.


    As always, form follows function.

    It might seem a little ridiculous to make a structure this big for something so small, but oh well. There is going to be a trading array afterwards inside the structure anyway. I tried for a more modern style in this one.


    Moved the system a little bit.

    I didn't even consider the hole the baby villagers are going up until later on. So I had to destroy it and rebuild it again about 10 blocks downwards. This makes it easier for me to build the trading array, and to build the structure around it.


    A quick 5-minute ice farm.

    I needed some ice for the water systems so I went to the nearest ice biome (which unfortunately, is across a 1500-block ocean). You might notice the blocks and wonder why I didn't just go for a small pond. The thing is, ice can only form when it is right next to a solid block. This pattern is the most efficient pattern out there so that ice forms the fastest. You can use this same pattern too for sugar cane farms. The difference is, the solid block is the water.


    What a place for an end portal.

    A full month late to go for the ender dragon. The first stronghold had an incredibly hidden end portal, so I gave up looking for it. When I went to the second portal ... what a sight.


    Always awesome to look at.

    Finally, that took quite a bit of time. Unfortunately, I died right after because an enderman took me from behind. I lost quite a bit, including Multiplier, my fortune pickaxe and my Power IV bow. However with the levels I got I am able to retrieve my fortune pickaxe back as well as another silk touch pickaxe.

    Also notice the name of my sword - Europa. I'm not too sure where the original word comes from, but I did name it off Jupiter's largest moon. From now on I will probably name my tools off other astronomical objects.


    Connected the portals together.

    With all that said and done, I connected my main base with this end portal room with a nether portal. Since the entire thing is submerged underwater, it's a really good spot for a future build. Hmm..


    Didn't turn out as planned.

    After the ender dragon fight I immediately went and fought the wither. Took a long time to find the skulls, but managed to after a couple hours. Originally I wanted to use a bedrock trick to kill the wither, but I accidentally pushed the lever back down and well, this happened. I managed to kill it eventually, but it's much, much harder.


    Beacon!

    Finally, the first ever beacon. I already have an idea where I want to put this, but first there's something important we have to do.


    Haste beacon! Infinite clay!

    I decided to place the beacon in the mesa I found last update. With an efficiency five pick, I am able to instamine the clay. Already at a double chest at the moment.


    An important moment.

    After two months, I have decided to turn natural regeneration back on. It was fun while it lasted, but I think that at this point ultra hardcore mode is pointless - considering how easy it is to get health potions. Thanks for the support the past two months, you guys have been awesome motivation for me to keep doing this :)

    Cleaning up the House
    28 November, 2013

    It seems to be a constant problem for me that over time, the terrain of my worlds become very flat. Literally all the trees within 200 blocks disappear. Instead of planting them back again, what's an even better solution?


    Oh no, the growing season's back

    But let's rewind a little bit. How did this happen?


    It's tough making custom trees

    In my opinion, anything organic is the bane of my building skills. I simply cannot make something that is organic yet still looking good. Nevertheless I did try my best here. It's similar to the other tree, but I tried to make the branches stick to the walls of the building to make it look a bit better.


    Step #1 of swamp restoration

    My main point to do this is swamp restoration. Cutting out all the trees in the area makes it look very plain. This is one step of that. Placing leaves all around the place helps a ton.


    A smaller tree, my first true organic 'build'

    The last two trees were very similar to one of the trees in the tree depository from Planet Minecraft. This tree is probably the very first tree that I make completely myself.


    I love how this tree looks

    I just love how this tree is connected to the building somewhat. The logs are placed on top of the red stained clay, making it seem as if the tree grew on top of the structure.


    In other news...

    With the swamp growing back to life outside, the underground needs a lot of polishing up. Surprisingly, the two chests of the witch farm is starting to fill up so I need some proper storage. I also need a proper furnace array because the manual one isn't very efficient or nearly as cool.


    Expansion

    First thing to do is to make that furnace array. I'll be doing the exact same thing as what I did in my last world - Tango Tek's Synchronised Furnace Array.


    Looking pretty good

    See the similarities? (Those of you who followed my old world). Notice how I changed the color scheme too. Instead of the brighter oak wood, I decide to use the new darker oak and the orange acacia wood.


    Looks complicated doesn't it?

    It is complicated. Well, sort of. The furnaces are connected to 3 hoppers - Input, output and fuel. That's about it.


    Exposed machinery

    There are three chests that connects to the array. 2 input chests and 1 output chest. The chest on the top left is the input for items to be smelted. The chest on the top right is the input for the furnace fuel. The bottom chest is the output. Note the lever. What it does is that it changes whether you want to gain xp from the farm or simply the items.



    That organization

    On the other side comes a storage system. It's very similar to the one I use in my old witch farm as well. It's a design by queenkinghappy but it is actually very easy to replicate. Simply use the normal sorting system design and tile it. Then, add an overflow line at the end of the hoppers.

    Oh, I also killed a wither.


    The Third Tower
    20 December, 2013

    Sorry for the incredibly delayed update, I haven't had time to play minecraft until about a week and a half ago. Nevertheless, in that time I did a couple of different things (then again, I always do different things each update). So let's begin.

    Before I build anything more I should do something very important first. As some of you might have guessed, I want to build all of the farms within my spawn chunks. This is to assure that everytime I play the game, all the farms are loaded and functional. To do that, I have to figure out exactly where my spawn chunks will end.



    I should have taken these screenshots sooner.

    And done! That wasn't too difficult but it did take about 15 minutes. What I did was I took a couple stacks of blocks, ran one direction and idle for about 5 minutes. The moment the blocks despawn is the exact border of the spawn chunks. Also, notice how I only took 2 different points instead of all 4. The reason for this is because I can find out the other borders using math. As the spawn chunks construct a square, it is very simple to find the other coordinate by finding the distance between the known coordinates and the center of the spawn chunks. I hope that makes sense.

    With all that said and done, we can continue building. One of the farms that are missing in my base is a sugar cane farm.


    Quick and efficient.

    For once, I don't feel like making an automatic version of the sugar cane farm (for now at least). Therefore, I made this little design. This design incorporates the most efficient placement of water possible, i.e, every single water block is surrounded by 4 sugar canes. This farm is incredibly efficient, incredibly quick to build and outputs too much sugar cane. Only issue is it's not automatic. For now.


    Expansion continues.

    The first step to expanding a base is obviously to create roads. This is a small path that I made circling around the two towers, and I think it looks great. Notice how these lamp-posts have redstone lamps that are always on. Where did the power come from?

    Well, these lamps are exploiting a trick with falling arrows that is discovered (at least where I saw it first) by Xisumavoid. To create a permanently on lamp, place a pressure plate above the lamp and use a dispenser to shoot an arrow onto the lamp. This arrow gets stuck inside the lamp and will never despawn.


    Another farm complete!

    Some may find it inhumane, but oh well. I finally made a cow farm that's much easier to use than my older one. The cows are contained in the top portion while the babies get pushed into the bottom portion. Just push the button on the right when you're willing to breed the cows. The button powers a dispenser that deploys water in front of it, making the cows float. This makes it such that the baby cows are pushed to the bottom part.


    Wow, I'm on a farm frenzy.

    One very significant part of construction is the use of different colours. Sheep? They can give you 16 different variants of colours. So a sheep farm is the farm I'll be building next.


    Monumental.

    The farm is looking impressive so far, I really like how it looks from this angle right now. I used my previous towers as a base, but I tried to combine it with the design of the trading house. The modern influence can be clearly seen from the multitude of columns and the use of black stained glass.



    A modern taste on the inside as well.

    I think the inside of the farm looks great as well. These floors are where the sheep will be. Each floor contains sheep of different colours, and there will be dispensers on each floor with a water bucket inside. When activated, the water will flush the wool onto the bottom.

    Note: I know the sheep's able to jump on the railing, I already fixed that later on.





    Another farm, really?

    Yep. With the sheep farm complete, I installed another farm in the base - a wheat farm. It outputs very little wheat in comparison to my other farms, but it is enough for my needs. The redstone behind it is very simple. There is a button that's connnected to a comparator-based pulse-extender. This creates an output long enough for the water to flush all of the wheat down into the hoppers. The hoppers are then connected to a small dropper elevator.


    Wow, not a farm.

    With all that said and done, I decided to extend the other side of the base. A large portion of this landmass is within the spawn chunks, but there is nothing inside it. This is actually connected to a door behind my old furnace array.



    Railings.

    As there is going to be a path there, railings are needed. This place also gives quite a good view on the witch farm. Notice how I decided to add some water vegetation as well. Not sure if it's too much though.


    Chicken Farm!

    To finish this entry, a chicken farm! It doesn't look too great though to be honest, I will probably redo all of the aesthetics again later on.

    This will be my last update of this year, unfortunately. I will be going off to Europe for the holidays (2 weeks to be exact) and will only be returning home on the 6th of Jan. Of course I will have some time then, but I obviously have to get over jet lag, exhaustion and other things like that. Nevertheless, merry christmas and happy new years for everyone!

    Iron Golem Woes
    28 January 2014

    As I get farther along into this world, I will eventually need stacks upon stacks of hoppers. While iron is not too hard to get from caving, it's all manual and doesn't feel as automated as I want this world to be. So the iron foundry is my choice of farm.



    I checked back to the coordinates of my spawn chunks again to see where exactly I can place my iron foundry. When that's done, I built the basic structure.



    The satellite structures are up and the villages are in place. Time to actually place the doors.



    ...and it doesn't work. When I was placing all the doors together, I decided to go back to 1.6.4 with the villager mod to see if I did anything wrong. And as it turns out, I did. Somewhere. Nevertheless, I kept trying and trying.



    As it turns out, the west satellite villages seem to merge together whenever I'm building the north satellite villages. This seems to only occur in 1.7.2 and not in 1.6.4. Very strange indeed. So what I did was I decided to only make the 28 village version instead of the maximum 44. Sure, it's a little bit less iron but it's still much more than I will need.



    With that problem sort-of-fixed, I went on to build the storage room and the casing of the nether portal. This is what I ended up with. I went with a stone-brick and dark oak palette, similar to the one that I'm using over on the eastern side of the base.



    Anywho, with all that said and done let's go work on something else. I found a Savanna Biome ~3000-4000 blocks away from spawn. It's a Savanna Plateau M, and I think the terrain makes for a really cool place to build.



    I think I got a little carried away by the building. This large house is pretty much my building shack, so where I place all the storage, my bed, furnaces etc. The structure to the right of it will be connected to the main house and will serve as an extension. I also place a full beacon at the bottom to try and find some diamonds (and I found about 20 diamond blocks worth)



    When I finished the buildings, I think it doesn't look steampunk enough. So how about some aqueducts? I eventually changed the stone brick to ice to serve as a transportation system for items.



    To finish it off, an overview of our new project! You can see at the very top there are 2 wheat farm platforms. These flow into the aqueducts that we made earlier on. Also note the detail in the chimney. I used an anvil at the very top and some cobwebs to represent the smoke.



    World Download

    https://www.mediafire.com/?991b1e6hx907sh9

    Note that when you open the world, you'll be in the nether. This is actually quite far away from the main base. To get there, head in the direction where both the x and z coordinates get smaller.

    Stay tuned for further updates, hope you're enjoying this series so far :)
    Posted in: Survival Mode
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