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    posted a message on Just want to change a few existing crafting recipes
    Wow, no replies? Does anyone even have any insight into why a problem like this is not simple to address in minecraft? Thanks!
    Posted in: Mapping and Modding Tutorials
  • 0

    posted a message on Just want to change a few existing crafting recipes
    Why is modding Minecraft so dang confusing???

    Now, let me preface this by saying that I have read up a little bit on this issue already. Yes, I know that Minecraft's code is not very neatly written. Yes, I know that the code is obfuscated, and that you need to decompile it before you can work on it. From what I gather, this is why one would need to start with Minecraft Forge /and/or Bukkit when modding.

    That said:

    How hard could it be to:
    1. Locate where an existing crafting recipe is stored in Minecraft's files, and:
    2. Change the recipe to something else using existing items?

    I'm not talking about adding items.

    I'm not talking about adding blocks.

    I don't want to do anything that complicated.

    Whenever I search for something like this, I get results like, "Install the Custom NPCs mod." No.
    1. That doesn't do what I want to do. It creates new recipes. It does not change existing recipes.
    2. It is out of date. I need something that works with 1.7.5, or I need to just make the modification myself.
    3. I don't want to add on a bunch of unnecessary stuff just to make a few small changes.

    How hard could it be to do something like change the torch recipe so that it requires 1 stick, 1 coal, AND 1 blaze powder!???

    I am not a complete rookie when it comes to modding this sort of thing. I used to mod Civilization IV extensively. To make an equivalently simple change in Civ4 (if, for example, I wanted to change the strength of an archer from 3 to 4), I would open up the "units.xml" file in notepad, use ctrl+f to search for the "archer" string, find where the archer's stats were located, find where it said <strength>3</strength> or something like that, and change the 3 to a 4. How hard was that? Not hard at all.

    It infuriates me that it is so much more complicated and confusing to mod a comparatively simple change in Minecraft.

    Anyhow, if anyone has any pointers, I would greatly appreciate it.

    Here's exactly what I would like to do:

    1. Change a handful of existing recipes.
    A. The torch recipe
    B. The wooden pickaxe recipe
    C. The wooden axe recipe
    D. The wooden gate recipe
    E. The stone sword recipe
    F. The stone pickaxe recipe
    2. Have this work in 1.7.5.
    3. Have this work in both survival single player and survival multiplayer.

    How hard could it be???
    Posted in: Mapping and Modding Tutorials
  • 1

    posted a message on Is Minecraft too easy?
    Yes, this thread is a bit redundant, as there is an identical one in the discussion forum, but so as many people as possible see this, I'm going to repost what I wrote in that thread right here:

    Nowadays, minecraft is way too easy for me if I play as most people play it. Here's what I do to make it harder:

    *Play in adventure mode with no bonus chest (you start with nothing, can't break most blocks, can't even dig 1x2 hole to hide in).
    *No wooden or stone pickaxes allowed.
    *No wooden or stone swords allowed.
    *No wooden axes allowed.
    *Torches allowed only after you acquire some blaze powder.

    Heeheehee! Surviving like this is definitely possible, but it is NOT easy. Hunger becomes a real issue. To make any technological progression, you have to get creepers to blow up wood for you, and/or then mine with TNT, until you get an iron pickaxe. Either way, you need creepers, which means your first day you should start out killing animals and gathering other food. If you are really in a bind, here's some low-tech quasi-renewable food:

    0 wooden logs required:
    *Zombie flesh from zombies burning up in the morning.
    *Breed chickens with grass seeds and/or eggs.
    ***If you find a village with a blacksmith's house, you can cook the chicken meat.

    1 crafting bench, 1 wooden log required (usually obtainable from one lucky creeper blast next to a tree):
    *Farm wheat with wooden hoe (which you can then use to breed animals if you want, or just for bread).
    *Bowls of soup.

    1 crafting bench, 1 wooden log, 2 string (from killing spiders):
    *Fishing.

    Melee tech progression:
    *Barehanded (0.5 hearts of damage).
    *Wooden shovel (1 heart of damage).
    *Stone axe (2.5 hearts of damage).
    *Iron sword (3.5 hearts of damage).
    *Diamond sword (4 hearts of damage).

    Other useful weapons:
    *Bow and arrow (requires crafting table, 1 wooden log, 3 string, arrows).
    *Flint&steel (requires shovel for flint, 1 iron ingot (obtainable from lucky zombie drops)).
    *Lava bucket (buckets can sometimes be found in goody chests long before you have the tech needed for 3 iron ingots).

    Low-tech lighting options:
    *Natural lava pools/lavafalls.
    *Torches in villages.
    *Active furnaces (to make sure no monsters spawn in your hut as you go outside to hunt creepers, put a stack of something in your hut's furnace to smelt for the night).
    *Sunlight. When doing shallow caving where only a layer of dirt is overhead, periodically dug holes up to ground to let sunlight in, and cave only during the day.

    Medium-tech lighting options:
    *Sprawling piles of wood lit with flint&steel (temporary lighting, useful for shallow caving early on).
    *Netherrack lit with flint&steel.
    *Lavafalls engineered with lava buckets.

    Armor progression:
    *Leather armor (needs only crafting table (sometimes obtainable in village), cows.
    *Iron armor (needs iron pickaxe...(much later in tech progression).

    Monsters you WANT to encounter early on:
    *Creepers (needed for blowing stuff up).
    *Spiders (easy to kill even barehanded as long as your back is covered, needed for string).

    Monsters you DON'T WANT to encounter early on:
    *Zombies (punching to death or even whacking to death with wooden shovel takes forever, they multiply and gang up on you, and minimal gain from fighting them).
    *Skeletons (unless you can hit at them safely or let them burn up in the morning).
    *Witches. Death.
    *Baby zombies....OHGODOHGODOHGODOHGOD!!!!!!!....

    Ideal biomes to start in:
    *Plains with some occasional trees around or trees bordering the plains area. Nice and flat. Easy to see and avoid monsters. Sometimes horses around for early leather armor.
    *Savanna. Nice and flat with sparse trees.

    Okay biomes to start in:
    *Roofed forest. Plentiful mushrooms, top of tree canopy provides nice safe walkway, creepers sometimes spawn in day under canopy, which is nice.
    *Jungle. Creepers sometimes spawn in daytime, and vines allow quick escape routes to higher ground in a pinch.

    Bad biomes to start in:
    *Any other forest type biome. Too many trees, not easy to run from monsters, easy to get cornered, no advantages otherwise.
    *Extreme hills. Without being able to place or remove blocks even getting down from the initial spawn can be tough. Hunger runs out quickly from jumping. Few trees. Overhangs sometimes nice for allowing creepers to spawn during day.
    *Mesa. Same problems as extreme hills.
    *Desert. No trees. Barely livable in terms of hunger by virtue of fact that zombie flesh and spider eyes can be harvested with help of cactus and sunlight. At least it is flat and makes it easy to avoid monsters. Get out of there and find trees ASAP.

    Next to impossible:
    *Isolated ocean island start with no trees and no animals. Only food available is by waiting for zombies to burn up in day (although they will probably just hop in water and not die). Or, take your chances fighting spiders for spider eyes (although doubtful whether you can actually accumulate net food in this way when factoring in punching and hunger from healing from poision). If nearest continent is not close enough to swim to without dying of hunger, and there are no underwater ravines/mineshafts (which could provide an alternative way of finding wood for a creeper to blow up), survival is physically impossible.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 0

    posted a message on (Survival mode?) too easy?
    Nowadays, minecraft is way too easy for me if I play as most people play it. Here's what I do to make it harder:

    *Play in adventure mode with no bonus chest (you start with nothing, can't break most blocks, can't even dig 1x2 hole to hide in).
    *No wooden or stone pickaxes allowed.
    *No wooden or stone swords allowed.
    *No wooden axes allowed.
    *Torches allowed only after you acquire some blaze powder.

    Heeheehee! Surviving like this is definitely possible, but it is NOT easy. Hunger becomes a real issue. To make any technological progression, you have to get creepers to blow up wood for you, and/or then mine with TNT, until you get an iron pickaxe. Either way, you need creepers, which means your first day you should start out killing animals and gathering other food. If you are really in a bind, here's some low-tech quasi-renewable food:

    0 wooden logs required:
    *Zombie flesh from zombies burning up in the morning.
    *Breed chickens with grass seeds and/or eggs.
    ***If you find a village with a blacksmith's house, you can cook the chicken meat.

    1 crafting bench, 1 wooden log required (usually obtainable from one lucky creeper blast next to a tree):
    *Farm wheat with wooden hoe (which you can then use to breed animals if you want, or just for bread).
    *Bowls of soup.

    1 crafting bench, 1 wooden log, 2 string (from killing spiders):
    *Fishing.

    Melee tech progression:
    *Barehanded (0.5 hearts of damage).
    *Wooden shovel (1 heart of damage).
    *Stone axe (2.5 hearts of damage).
    *Iron sword (3.5 hearts of damage).
    *Diamond sword (4 hearts of damage).

    Other useful weapons:
    *Bow and arrow (requires crafting table, 1 wooden log, 3 string, arrows).
    *Flint&steel (requires shovel for flint, 1 iron ingot (obtainable from lucky zombie drops)).
    *Lava bucket (buckets can sometimes be found in goody chests long before you have the tech needed for 3 iron ingots).

    Low-tech lighting options:
    *Natural lava pools/lavafalls.
    *Torches in villages.
    *Active furnaces (to make sure no monsters spawn in your hut as you go outside to hunt creepers, put a stack of something in your hut's furnace to smelt for the night).
    *Sunlight. When doing shallow caving where only a layer of dirt is overhead, periodically dug holes up to ground to let sunlight in, and cave only during the day.

    Medium-tech lighting options:
    *Sprawling piles of wood lit with flint&steel (temporary lighting, useful for shallow caving early on).
    *Netherrack lit with flint&steel.
    *Lavafalls engineered with lava buckets.

    Armor progression:
    *Leather armor (needs only crafting table (sometimes obtainable in village), cows.
    *Iron armor (needs iron pickaxe...(much later in tech progression).

    Monsters you WANT to encounter early on:
    *Creepers (needed for blowing stuff up).
    *Spiders (easy to kill even barehanded as long as your back is covered, needed for string).

    Monsters you DON'T WANT to encounter early on:
    *Zombies (punching to death or even whacking to death with wooden shovel takes forever, they multiply and gang up on you, and minimal gain from fighting them).
    *Skeletons (unless you can hit at them safely or let them burn up in the morning).
    *Witches. Death.
    *Baby zombies....OHGODOHGODOHGODOHGOD!!!!!!!....

    Ideal biomes to start in:
    *Plains with some occasional trees around or trees bordering the plains area. Nice and flat. Easy to see and avoid monsters. Sometimes horses around for early leather armor.
    *Savanna. Nice and flat with sparse trees.

    Okay biomes to start in:
    *Roofed forest. Plentiful mushrooms, top of tree canopy provides nice safe walkway, creepers sometimes spawn in day under canopy, which is nice.
    *Jungle. Creepers sometimes spawn in daytime, and vines allow quick escape routes to higher ground in a pinch.

    Bad biomes to start in:
    *Any other forest type biome. Too many trees, not easy to run from monsters, easy to get cornered, no advantages otherwise.
    *Extreme hills. Without being able to place or remove blocks even getting down from the initial spawn can be tough. Hunger runs out quickly from jumping. Few trees. Overhangs sometimes nice for allowing creepers to spawn during day.
    *Mesa. Same problems as extreme hills.
    *Desert. No trees. Barely livable in terms of hunger by virtue of fact that zombie flesh and spider eyes can be harvested with help of cactus and sunlight. At least it is flat and makes it easy to avoid monsters. Get out of there and find trees ASAP.

    Next to impossible:
    *Isolated ocean island start with no trees and no animals. Only food available is by waiting for zombies to burn up in day (although they will probably just hop in water and not die). Or, take your chances fighting spiders for spider eyes (although doubtful whether you can actually accumulate net food in this way when factoring in punching and hunger from healing from poision). If nearest continent is not close enough to swim to without dying of hunger, and there are no underwater ravines/mineshafts (which could provide an alternative way of finding wood for a creeper to blow up), survival is physically impossible.
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on New Gravel Texture - Your Opinion?
    As cement, it would look fine, but it does not look like gravel. It is hard to distinguish between it and cobblestone, which is going to make caving and surveying more mentally taxing. "Oh, there's cobble, have I been here before?...Herobrine?...Oh, it's just that new weird gravel...."

    I hate it. Bring back the old, "busy," "pink" gravel. That's more like what gravel looks like!
    Posted in: Recent Updates and Snapshots
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    posted a message on Monetary theory and emeralds
    I see a lot of people asking, "Why do we need a new ore (emeralds) for trading with villagers? Why can't we just use gold nuggets?" Others demands a use for emeralds other than for trading. Some complain about emeralds being 25 times rarer than diamonds when mining them.

    What I am about to do is explain why the way emeralds have been implemented makes sense. Now, I don't know if the creators at Mojang have thought about all of the factors I will be covering, or whether this is all coincidence, but in any case, the current implementation of emeralds makes sense from a standpoint of realistic monetary theory.

    Reason #1: Inflation.

    An ideal currency is one that is naturally very rare. For something to act as a stable store of value, the total amount of that currency in circulation needs to stay relatively constant. If you make more of the currency, its value will go down—you will get inflation. Therefore, it makes sense that emeralds in Minecraft are 25 times rarer than diamond in terms of natural occurrence of the ore. What this does is ensure that the hypothetical amount of emeralds in circulation stays relatively constant—more concretely, it assures that you have to sell useful stuff to villagers (like wheat or books or whatnot) about as often as you take useful stuff from them. If emeralds were as rare as, say, gold, then you could get by giving villagers emerald after emerald for useful stuff, and at the end of the day, you will have a bunch of useful stuff, and the villagers will all (hypothetically) have a bunch of useless emeralds (useless insofar as not having an inherent use—and in trading with each other, the emeralds would not be very useful because all of the villagers would each have so many of those emeralds that there would be inflation). So, emeralds being rare helps Minecraft better simulate a real economy.

    Reason #2: A useless item is an ideal currency.

    An ideal currency is an item whose value is relatively stable. This stability makes keeping track of the values of other items easier. For this reason, a useful item is not an ideal currency. If an item (like gold nuggets) that has practical uses is also used as a currency, then the value of this currency will fluctuate based on the supply and demand for the item as a useful commodity—in other words, if powered rails are needed, the value of gold will suddenly go up—and so will the value of everything else, since everything else is denominated in gold. Inflation by a different route. Therefore, you want an item like emeralds that is otherwise completely useless if you are looking for something to use as a currency.

    For these two reasons, Mojang's implementation of emeralds is surprisingly realistic from the standpoint of monetary theory, whether by accident or design.

    That said, I'm not really sure why Mojang thought that using a currency system, as opposed to a barter system, was the way to go. Perhaps it would have been more complicated to code a balanced barter system (where you directly trade, say, a certain amount of wheat for iron or something). Based on the level of economic development of Minecraft villages, one would expect, anthropologically-speaking, for these villages to have a barter system rather than a currency system. Currencies usually benefit from large empires that can enforce the recognition of a particular currency over a wide jurisdiction. It would be odd to find isolated villages all using a single currency (although, if emerald is one of the only items in the Minecraft universe without another, practical use, then perhaps it would not be so surprising to find separate villages independently landing upon the same choice of currency, or maybe agreeing among themselves to all use emeralds).

    This is all speculation with regards to the realism of Minecraft. At the level of gameplay, the currency system implemented seems to work fine. My only concern is whether it is possible to find a villager who buys wheat for emeralds, and just keep shoveling wheat to that villager for emeralds. That would be both unbalanced and unrealistic. I hope that villagers start demanding different things once you have exhausted one type of trading opportunity.
    Posted in: Recent Updates and Snapshots
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    posted a message on Notch's Golden Apple Returns [Confirmed]
    My suggestion for a 72-ingot golden apple would be to permanently add an extra heart, zelda-style, up to 20 hearts. Just put the extra row of hearts above the current heart row, and shift the hunger bar over to the other side with the armor slots.
    Posted in: Recent Updates and Snapshots
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    posted a message on Very simple realism mod request
    Some additional thoughts concerning this mod:

    Why do I call it "brutal realism"? Well, its restrictions certainly can be brutal at times, and here is how I think it is more realistic:

    I am taking it as a given that, in order to mine a material, one would realistically need to use a material of greater hardness. In real life, chopping wood with wood would not work very well. Your wooden "axe" would fall apart just as readily as the wood you were chopping. (Not to mention something like trying to mine stone with a wooden pickaxe...) You'd need at least a stone handaxe in order to chop a log in real life. And if you tried to mine stone with a stone pickaxe, your stone pickaxe would shatter just as readily as the stone you were trying to mine.

    So we have basically 5 different hardness levels of materials in minecraft:
    1. Soft and/or loose materials. Wool, dirt, sand, gravel, mushrooms, tree leaves. Things you should be able to harvest by hand.
    2. Firm, but brittle materials. Glowstone. This would hurt your hand if you tried to harvest it by hand, so you'd need at least a wooden pickaxe in order to harvest it (I would also put glass in this category if it were re-harvestable in the first place).
    3. Firm and tough. Tree logs, crafting tables, sandstone, and netherrack. These things would need at least stone tools in order to harvest, realistically. (I would put cacti in this category too, except that in the game it is also possible to harvest cactus by digging out the sand underneath it. So making cactus require stone axes to harvest it would not change the game and would just add hassle).
    4. Rock-hard. Stone and stone-related blocks, netherbrick and related blocks, bricks, furnaces, and ores. I consider ore blocks to be basically stone with little pieces of the various ores embedded in them, so they would also fit in this category. All these would require iron tools in order to harvest.
    5. Super-hard. Obsidian. Requires diamond pickaxe to harvest.

    As for the change to the torch crafting recipe, the idea behind that is that I only accept the premise of a never-ending burning item in the game if there is some vaguely "magical" game mechanic or material behind it that doesn't exist in real life. For example, wood and coal exist in real life, and we know that they do not burn forever. But netherrack doesn't exist in real life, so who is to say that it would not have its own reason for why it burned forever once lit? Likewise, while I don't like the idea of never-ending torches made out of just wood and coal, if you add some vaguely-magial blaze powder to that recipe, suddenly it kind of "makes sense." It also happens to create the gameplay change that I want, which is to have lighting be something that one has to do much more work to obtain.

    Also, I just sent a lengthy pm to DorkTaco regarding this mod idea, and now that I think about it, it actually explains a lot of the thinking behind the mod, so I'll repost most of the pm here:

    As for your concerns, I have tested these restrictions out on my own, and in hardcore mode no less! (not with modified files, but just with holding myself to the restrictions), and a quasi-normal game of minecraft is perfectly possible with these restrictions. You just have to think creatively and be very careful. I don't call this a "brutal realism" mod for nothing...

    A.) It is quite easy to get 3 iron by finding surface iron and/or iron near cave entrances and blowing it up with TNT. The TNT will tend to destroy a lot of the iron, but even so, it usually only takes about 4 TNT charges blowing up 4 iron veins to get the 3 iron for an iron pickaxe. Of course, there are other ways to boot-strap one's way to iron pickaxes: killing zombies, finding iron pickaxes in chests, killing naturally-spawned iron golems (theoretically). But the TNT method is pretty reliable. It just requires kiling about 20 creepers for 20 or so gunpowder, which is doable in a night or two out in the desert with a stone sword and leather armor.

    B.) Getting 3 stone for a stone axe is really simple. Either 1 TNT, or a few creeper blasts on a stone surface will get you stone for a stone axe. (And remember, wooden picks can't mine stone. You need iron to get drops from mining stone. And wooden planks also need a stone axe in order to mine, by the way). "Ah, but how do you get the wood for the crafting table?" There are exactly 2 tree logs that must be creeper-mined at the beginning of the world: one for a crafting table, and 1 for a wooden pressure plate for setting off future TNT. Yes, you have no armor at this point, but it's really not that tricky. Just lure a creeper over to a tree, stand there, and back away a bit at the last second. If you're good, you can get him to explode without taking hardly any damage. Generally, you'll take about 4 or 5 hearts of damage, but you can regenerate that quickly. And you can generally get 2-3 logs per creeper-mining blast. Anyways, after you have a crafting table and a pressure plate, everything else is theoretically obtainable with TNT (including more wood), although often it is easier to just creeper-mine a few more logs or some stone, at least until one has a few wooden swords to start killing creepers with.

    Actually, let me just walk you through a typical brutal realism game. What I like about this mod idea is, it makes the player spend a bit more time at each tool stage. You know how difficult going from iron tools to diamond tools is in the normal game? That's about how difficult it is going from wooden tools to stone tools, and stone tools to iron tools. Likewise, leather armor actually becomes useful. With a wooden hoe, you can farm wheat and breed cows far before you can mine iron ore.

    Anyways, here's how one of my typical brutal realism test games went:

    Day 1:

    A. Find good land (plains with a few scattered trees is best. Tundra with a few scattered trees is passable. Forests are tough. Jungles, a nightmare. Desert is nice to have nearby for killing creepers at night, but won't be suitable on its own. Ocean biome could be really tough or impossible, depending on how many starting trees are on one's island. NPC villages are, of course, a goldmine. Lavafalls and surface lava ponds are nice for the lighting). Try to conserve energy while traveling.

    B. Kill a few cows and/or pigs for raw meat.

    C. Get some saplings for sticks, and maybe get an apple or two.

    D. Build a dirt hut. My favorite design is to shave off a 2 or 3-high tree to where its leaves are 1-thick, and build under the leaves. It lets light in during the day and keeps mobs out. Maybe put some cactus around the perimeter.

    Night 1:

    A. Creeper-mine some logs. Try to stay away from other mobs. 2 logs can get you a crafting table, a wooden pressure plate, and a wooden sword (with the addition of a stick). Use the sword to kill some more creepers. Fighting them on a stone outcrop is ideal since some will inevitably explode, and you can get stone for a stone axe to guarantee oneself a nearly unlimited supply of wood (and thus wooden swords).

    B. If you are really desperate for food, kill a couple of spiders for string to make a fishing rod. And/or you can make a bow.

    Day 2:

    A. If you have 2 wooden planks available, consider making a wooden hoe and getting a wheat farm going near a natural pond. Wheat is ideal for breeding cows (for meat and leather armor) and chickens (for arrows).

    B. You can also make reusable wooden bowls for mushroom soup if there are mushrooms around. Once you have wooden swords, you can take on skeletons and get bone meal for growing giant mushrooms, making one's supply of mushroom soup, and thus food, a non-issue. If you are near a jungle, using cocoa beans for cookies can stretch your limited wheat supplies farther. And as I said before, there is always fishing too.

    Night 2:

    A. If you don't have a stone axe yet, that is your priority. Kill creepers with wooden swords for enough gunpowder for a TNT and mine some stone. Use that for a stone axe and, if possible, a furnace. A furnace will help in a number of ways: cooking meat, making charcoal (now that one has a stone axe and therefore access to a large supply of wood), and making glass and/or clay bricks. Having your furnace cooking in your hut while you are out hunting creepers can also provide light for the hut and ensure that monsters don't spawn in there while you are away.

    B. Kill skeletons for arrows and especially bone meal.

    Day 3:

    A. Harvest wheat or other food items. Breed animals. Try to work up to a full suit of leather armor. Try to get a nice stack of arrows too.

    B. Make improvements to your hut. Fences, glass, brick, snow, and cactus are possible building materials. If you have enough stone for a stone pickaxe, you can harvest sandstone...or just make sandstone out of sand.

    C. Scout for cave entrances or other spots with surface iron showing.

    Night 3:

    A. Kill creepers for gunpowder for TNT. Hopefully you have stone swords, a bow, some arrows, and some leather armor by now. Kill skeletons or other mobs as desired.

    Days 4 through X: Hopefully you have enough gunpowder for some TNT. Depending on how much visible iron ore is around, and what kind of luck you have with the TNT, getting the 3 iron you need for an iron pickaxe can either be really easy or kinda hard. The worst case scenario is, you don't find any surface iron nearby, and you start using your TNT for a borehole straight down into the earth. Eventually you will hit some iron. I had to do this on one test run, and after a few nights of creeper hunting and about a dozen TNT blasts or so (and about 20 or so layers deeper), I got enough iron for an iron pickaxe.

    Post iron-pickaxe stage: Congrats! Now you have a sustainable way of getting more iron at will. Try to find some more surface iron for making a bucket (for lava) and/or flint-&-steel. Both will allow you to light your way farther into caves to get more iron.

    At some point, after you get a bucket, you'll want to go to the Nether. First, you'll want netherrack. You can light netherrack with flint-&-steel in caves for inextinguishable light. Eventually, you'll want to find a Nether stronghold and a blaze spawner for potions. You might also want to set up a blaze farm for harvesting blaze rods for blaze powder (and thus torches).

    Go caving some more and get enough iron for a full suit of iron armor. Continue caving as desired.

    After that, it plays more or less like a normal game of minecraft. Of course, at this point, one is pretty close to being ready to take on the dragon.

    What I like about this "brutal realism" setup is:
    1. There is more difficulty than in the base game (desired by many players at this point).
    2. The difficulty progression and "tech progression" is more even. (For example, leather armor and wooden tools actually get used for a while. TNT actually has a practical—indeed, essential—usefulness).

    I hope I have answered your questions. If you have any more, please let me know. And once again, I really appreciate your interest in this idea!

    Posted in: Requests / Ideas For Mods
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    posted a message on Very simple realism mod request
    I have a very simple mod request. I would make this mod myself, except I have zero knowledge of mod-making, even after trying to learn a few basic things.

    Brutal Realism Mod

    *Crafting changes:
    1. Any tree sapling type can be turned into a stick. 1 sapling makes 1 stick.
    2. Torches require a stick, blaze powder, and coal, going from bottom up in the crafting box. This recipe makes 4 torches.

    Block/tool changes:
    1. All tree log types require at least a stone axe in order to get item drops from them. Crafting tables likewise require a stone axe or better in order to collect.
    2. Glowstone requires at least a wooden pickaxe in order to get item drops from it.
    3. Sandstone (and all sandstone-related blocks) and netherrack require at least a stone pickaxe in order to get item drops from them.
    4. Stone, cobblestone, and all stone-related blocks (including furnaces and stone pressure plates) require at least an iron pickaxe in order to get item drops from them.
    5. All ore blocks (coal ore, iron ore, gold ore, redstone ore, diamond ore, lapis ore) require at least an iron pickaxe in order to get item drops from them.
    6. Brick and all brick-related blocks require at least an iron pickaxe for item drops.
    7. Nether brick and all related blocks require at least an iron pickaxe for item drops.
    Posted in: Requests / Ideas For Mods
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    posted a message on Brutal realism challenge
    Brutal Realism Challenge

    The basic principles behind this challenge are:
    1. Infinitely-burning torches aren't realistic. They are out of the game, as are jack-o-lanterns. All other lighting options have at least some sort of in-game explanation (netherrack is a vaguely magical substance that allows flames to burn on them forever, etc.)
    2. Tree-punching is not realistic.
    3. It is not realistic to collect substances unless one has a tool a tier above the hardness of that substance. So, to collect wood, you need stone tools. To collect stone and ores embedded in stone, you should need iron tools. So...

    Rules:
    1. No torches. No jack-o-lanterns. Any other lighting is permissible.
    2. Altered tool requirements:
    A. No tree-punching. Tree logs and wood planks can only be collected by stone axes or better (iron, diamond), or from explosions. Likewise with workbenches, chests, and other wood-derivative products.
    B. All ores (coal, iron, gold, redstone, lapis, diamond) require iron pickaxes or better to collect, or explosions.
    C. Stone and all stone derivatives (cobblestone, stone bricks, stone slabs, stone stairs, furnaces, etc.) require iron pickaxes or better to collect, or explosions. Ditto with netherbrick, netherbrick fences, and netherbrick stairs.
    D. Netherrack and sandstone require stone pickaxes or better to collect, or explosions.
    E. Cacti require at least a wooden axe to collect, or explosions. Likewise, glass and glowstone require at least wooden tools to break, or explosions.
    Goal:
    *Collect a stack of iron ingots. (This is a sign that you have reached resource sustainability).


    Strategy:
    1. Once you get enough iron for an iron pickaxe and a lava-bucket, you can reliably and sustainably get more iron. After that point, this brutal realism challenge plays much like more normal Minecraft, minus the fact that you have to substitute burning netherrack and lava for torches (like in the 404 challenge). But getting to iron tools is tough. Here's what I recommend...
    2. Day 1: Build a dirt hut. Get some animal meat and/or apples from breaking leaves. Try not to expend much energy. Night 1: Lure a creeper to blow up near a bunch of trees. Pray that one of these explosions drops a couple of logs.
    3. With your couple of logs, create a workbench. Carefully select where you want to place it, because you won't be able to move it for a while. If you have another log, create a wooden pressure plate. If you have yet another log, create a couple of wooden swords.
    4. Go kill creepers until you have 5 gunpowder. Craft a TNT. Set it off somewhere preferably where you can get logs and stone from the explosion.
    5. Once you get enough stone from TNT-mining and/or creeper-mining, create a stone axe. Now you can get all the wood (and wooden swords) you want. Also make a wooden hoe at this point, and get a farm going to breed cows for leather armor and meat. Continue killing creepers for gunpowder.
    6. Once you get enough stone, make a furnace. Now you can cook wood for charcoal and cook animal meat. Also, start making stone swords. This will make the creeper-killing go more quickly.
    7. Find surface iron or iron near the entrance to a cave. If no such iron is available, start blowing up a borehole into the ground with TNT. Get iron, make an iron pickaxe and flint-&-steel and/or bucket for lava. Use the flint-&-steel and/or lava-bucket to light your way into caves. Mine more iron. Congratulations, you've bootstrapped your way to resource sustainability!


    Bonus points:
    1. Play in hardcore mode.
    2. Don't rely on NPC villages for workbenches and furnaces.
    3. Play with lowest brightness setting ("moody").

    I have already completed a run of this challenge, so I know for certain it is quite doable. Certainly easier than the "no crafting table" challenge.

    I will now do another run, this time in hardcore mode, and I will document my progress with screenshots.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
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    posted a message on Firelight Challenge
    Wow, I didn't even think of using a surface lava pool and digging down. I guess that just goes to show what a little branch mining and engineering can do. That's why it's so hard to design minecraft challenges. People are always so good at using the game mechanics in creative ways to work around the intended challenge (in this case, having to mainly use flint-&-steel to light one's way during caving).

    I suppose one could add an additional restriction in order to get players to rely on the intended challenge of using flint-&-steel: no shaft/branch mining, no digging stairsteps down, etc.. Caving in natural caves only.

    Edit: And yes, I think "moody" is the default brightness setting. Maybe that's one reason why the full release seems easier than back when we were playing in beta--we didn't have the ability to artificially jack up the brightness level back then, I don't think.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
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    posted a message on Firelight Challenge
    Oh man, I just tested this challenge out, and Minecraft is back to being 100% terrifying.

    The key, I've found, is to turn your brightness setting all the way down to "moody." At that brightness level, you can't see squat unless you have light around. It took me forever to get my first iron to even get a flint-&-steel because I couldn't go more than ~15 blocks into any cave without being able to see the ores (or the monsters, or the cave itself for that matter). I had to put down a furnace and cook something to finally find some iron.

    After I got my first flint-&-steel, I could go a bit farther in, but man is it scary! The fires seem to want to go out right at the worst moment, like when you hear a skeleton approaching. Suddenly arrows are hitting you from out of the pitch blackness. Then, when you go to head back, you realize that the way back is pitch black and you might not be able to figure out which way you came. Of course, god forbid if you run out of flint-&-steels....

    I've been playing a while, and it has been a struggle just to get some iron pants and two flint-&-steel. I might actually look for some cows to get some leather armor because getting iron is far from easy if you rely on caving.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
  • 2

    posted a message on Firelight Challenge
    I read a forum topic recently where someone complained about minecraft not being scary anymore. Well, here's a challenge to put the fear back into minecraft:

    The Firelight Challenge

    Rules:
    1. No crafting or placing of torches. (Pre-generated torches in villages and mineshafts can stay).
    2. No jack-o-lanterns.
    3. No placing or moving lava with buckets. (Water can still be moved with buckets).
    4. Play with "moody" brightness setting (lowest setting).

    Victory condition: Make it to the Nether.

    Bonus points: Play in hardcore mode.

    Commentary:
    Here's what you can use for light:
    1. Lighting things on fire with flint-&-steel.
    2. The light from cooking things in furnaces.
    3. Redstone torches and redstone blocks.

    Other ways you can prevent mob spawns (such as in your place of shelter):
    1. Make floors out of half-slabs.

    Tips for caving:
    1. Place a group of 7 or 8 wood plank blocks and light them on fire. This should work as a bonfire and should keep burning for a little bit.
    2. Seal off alternate paths.

    Note: Getting to the Nether will require obtaining three diamonds and mining obsidian the old-fashioned way because one won't be able to build a Nether portal by moving lava around.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
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    posted a message on Village vs. village
    Well, even if one cannot clone the villagers, one can manually spawn them in the cloned village until they reach the same number.

    The only drawback about this idea that I see is that it could be difficult determining when one has killed off all of the enemy's iron golems. Players can also craft iron golems manually. Therefore, one could make the victory condition the destruction of some item in some vault in the opposing village guarded by an iron golem.

    Here's specifically how I would set up the villages:
    *In addition to the usual stuff (wheat fields, villager houses), each one would have a main citadel with a barracks (with beds where players would re-spawn), main storage room, enchanting room, and low-volume mob grinder. The storage room would have a huge supply of nether wart (going into the nether would be against the rules), some wood, stone, arrows, food, and leather, but not much else to start off with. Each team would actually have to work for its supplies.
    *The subsurface of each village would be encased in bedrock, so tunneling below the village walls and the defensive spawners would not be possible below a certain point. Nor would mining from inside the village be possible.
    *There would be a rail line going out of the village over the main bridge down into mines that would be carved out in between the two villages. Massive veins of MCedited coal and iron would be close by each village. Massive manually-placed veins of redstone, glowstone (for potions), gold, and diamond would be farther out, practically in the middle between the two villages.
    *Lava would be present on the map, but rare and extremely hard to get. There might be one central lava pool in the middle of no-man's land in between the two villages, with lava everywhere else in the map edited out.
    Posted in: 1.1 Update Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Village vs. village
    With the introduction of villager breeding and iron golems, a new multiplayer contest has just become possible.

    We know that, under the right conditions, villagers can breed like mad--and with that comes a lot of iron golems.

    What villager breeding and iron golems do is, they give a self-sustaining, automated economy of sorts that can be defended.

    This, then, is the idea for the new multiplayer contest: kill all of the opposing village's iron golems and win. (In other words, drop the opposing village's population below 15, and kill off all existing iron golems).

    The map would be set up like this:
    1. Take a naturally-generated NPC village in its natural surroundings.
    2. Enlarge it a bit so that it gets a pretty fast villager breeding rate (and thus, so that one gets a pretty decent number of iron golems to help out).
    3. Put a wall around the village and a bunch of spawners all around the bottom. Have one bridge leading out of the village that is safe from those spawners.
    4. Go into MCEdit. Clone the village and the surrounding countryside for about ~1000 blocks out, and paste a copy of this terrain symmetrically next to the original area. That way both teams have the exact same stuff to work with. (Note, however, that there is only 1 "lane." Unlike with Race-for-wool, the two teams would directly interact).

    Each village might come pre-stocked with tools, weapons, potions, TNT, etc.

    One could pursue a number of strategies: target the enemy's villagers, target their iron golems directly, TNT siege the enemy village's houses, throw potions in order to harm or buff the enemy's golems or one's own, respectively...I think there's a lot of emergent gameplay potential with these new gameplay mechanics!
    Posted in: 1.1 Update Discussion
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