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    posted a message on What is the Densest Possible Polyworld?

    Thank you! :)

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on What is the Densest Possible Polyworld?

    Hi!


    I'd like to introduce to you guys a concept I'm sure you're well aware of, "Polyworlds," a term I dub for worlds that have gone through many series of terrain generation, causing sudden changes in biomes, structures, etc. One thing I think is interesting about these worlds is that it can lead to half-generated structures, as well as a myriad of unique land features that would not be found in an otherwise non-polyworld save file.


    For more on Polyworlds, checkout the first couple minutes of this video explaining:


    Another question this leads me to ask is "What is the densenst possible polyworld?" Meaning, considering all infdev to today versions of minecraft, anytime there would be a new terrain generation algorithm which causes a seed to generate differently, you could theoretically pass a save file between these different versions a maximum number of times. What is that maximum? What is the densest possible polyworld?


    This is a question, along with many others, I'm attempting to answer in a Polwyorld Creation Series on YouTube I'm making. I've been a Minecraft YouTuber in the past as well-- I made "How Big is Minecraft?" and "Is Real Life the Same as Minecraft?" to name a couple. As time from 2012 to today has passed, unfortunately the algorithm and all has caused my channel to decline, so if you liked that content before and want similar content moving forward, I implore you to checkout my newest series I'm working on! There's currently three episodes out, and here's the newest one:



    I tackle more topics and ideas than just polyworlds, too, it's kind of an introspective, philosophical series that appeals to a certain aesthetic I think is solely unique to minecraft and my channel. If you're interested at all, please, consider giving the videos a try.


    Anyway, as for how to find the densest possible polyworld, my current thoughts are to take a single seed as an independent variable. Then, generate that seed into minecraft for as many versions there are of minecraft possible. Compare each generated world, and for the worlds that are the same those versions can be ignored, since they don't change the terrain generation. Once you find each unique verison of the seed, then, you can take that single save file and generate it through each of those "unique" versions, walking far enough in each one to generate new chunks using that version's algorithm.

    Is this a viable approach to finding the densest possible polyworld? Or, if there is already a clearcut answer, please let me know!

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on What is the Densest Possible Polyworld?

    Deleted

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on Minecraft Polyworld Creation - a series where we forcefully create a polyworld

    Episode 2 is out for those curious, we create "Memory Museum" and explore some more!


    Posted in: Let's Plays
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    posted a message on What are "Polyworlds", and how they can directly affect your Minecraft Worlds

    That's really neat Deltachu, I'm trying to simulate that experience starting with infdev Minecraft in my YouTube series "Polyworld Creation".


    I was wondering though which versions of Minecraft change terrain generation specifically, is there a list out there of all the Minecraft versions that changed terrain generation? Or will I have to dig a little bit myself haha.

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on What are "Polyworlds", and how they can directly affect your Minecraft Worlds

    Back in 1.11, some players were grumbling about having to create a new world, or explore ridiculously far out to the "virgin chunks" to have hope of finding a woodland mansion. (They're pretty rare anyway).

    Similar things have happened with any big update, the most iconic is probably the adventure update, 1.8 Beta, which introduced generated structures. Villages, ravines, and abandoned mineshafts all came in this one update, in case you've forgotten. And while many players call forfeit to these updates and create new worlds, some go on and deal with having to journey to more and more distant chunks.

    I'm calling these types of worlds, which have had multiple types of terrain generation infused within it through Minecraft history, polyworlds. You can call it whatever you want, but it's the word I just happened to pick.

    As we've seen with polyworlds, when the borders of the old and new chunks meet, the game makes no hesitation to switch over to the new form of terrain generation. Many times this creates the effect of dramatic walls or sudden cliffs. And this can happen many more times than just once, if you play on a world long enough.

    But what if, I thought, the world borders cut off on a generated structure?

    I carried out an experiment then, figured out how far Steve's render distance was on an old version of Minecraft, found a village on 1.11, went to that same seed on 1.8 Beta (a version from ages ago) and walked close enough to load half of the village's chunks.

    Then I converted to 1.11, and walked to the results and was pleased all-the-while perplexed. Firstly, the operation was a success. Through Polyworld-based mechanics, we can find half-structures. Like I said, arguably these are then the most rare structures one can find, as the conditions for one to generate are so scarce.

    Although I didn't want to ramble on and on too much in the video, I want to bring up one thing that caught my interest. The village that was "cut off" with the borders of old and new chunks, actually slightly leaked over into the old chunks. Not only did it slightly leak over, but what would be the grass road actually adapted to the surrounding water and became a wooden dock. That's crazy! When I did this with the Woodland Mansion as shown later in the video, it was a completely clean cut, so it leads me to wonder if not all structures are generated equally.

    In summary, we tackled the basic mechanics of polyworlds, and also found out half-structures can be done.
    But now I'm dying to know, what's the densest possible polyworld as mentioned in the video? And what causes some structures to adapt to old chunks like the lingering village? While others just go with the flow of the new borders?

    I've actually started a new series based on this idea to find out. It's called Minecraft Polyworld Creation. If you enjoyed the first video then I'm sure you'll enjoy this next analytical series too.


    Anyway I hope you enjoyed my spiel and the discoveries I made. Perhaps you guys can help me figure out some of these later questions that stemmed from this initial investigation!
    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on Minecraft Polyworld Creation - a series where we forcefully create a polyworld

    A polyworld is a world generated in Minecraft that has gone through various updates of terrain generation, so that the chunks suddenly change when loading between new chunks in the new update. This can lead to some interesting features like half-structures.


    More info on this here

    This series will be like a let's play, except the commentary is typically scripted and will be added in post-production, so the content is a little more to the point than a typical let's play.


    If any of you are familiar with my channel, (best known for "Is Real Life the Same as Minecraft" and "How Big is Minecraft") I've done lots of analytical Minecraft videos over the years, in addition to other games. This series will pay homage to that, my life in general, and of course the game of Minecraft as a whole.


    I hope you enjoy this video and perhaps stick around as the series progresses.

    Posted in: Let's Plays
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    posted a message on I discovered a new structure within Minecraft

    Wait so in that last picture, those "arms" stretching out, generating the world, are due to the explosion spreading that far? That's pretty metal.

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on I discovered a new structure within Minecraft

    Thanks so much for this really in-depth explanation, quite honestly this part of terrain generation may warrant a whole video itself.


    So with 1.8 Beta when the first generated structures came to be (right?) Mojang added a new code? And it's always been separate from biomes/caves etc?


    Furthermore, is there a particular reason that the populated area is always offset to the southeast?


    It's always cool to learn more about this game from a more "in-depth" perspective.

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on I discovered a new structure within Minecraft

    It's been a little bit since my last Minecraft video, this one has a different tone now. A bit more sciency, a bit more mathy, like the good old days.

    With 1.11 here some players are grumbling about having to create new world, or explore ridiculously far out to the "virgin chunks" to have hope of finding a woodland mansion. (They're pretty rare anyway guys) But this was never a new problem.

    Similar things have happened with any big update, most iconically is probably the adventure update, 1.8 Beta, which introduced generated structures. Villages, ravines, abandoned, and abandoned mineshafts all came in this one update, in case you've forgotten. And while many players forfeit to these updates and create new worlds, some go on and deal with having to journey to more and more distant chunks.

    I'm calling these types of worlds, which have had multiple types of terrain generation infused within it through Minecraft history, polyworlds. You can call it whatever you want, but it's the word I just happened to pick.

    As we've seen with polyworlds, when the borders of the old and new chunks meet, the game makes no hesitation to switch over to the new form of terrain generation. Many times this creates the effect of dramatic walls or sudden cliffs. And this can happen many more times than just once, if you play on a world long enough.

    But what if, I thought, the world borders cut off on a generated structure?

    I carried out an experiment then, figured out how far Steve's render distance was on an old version of Minecraft, found a village on 1.11, went to that same seed on 1.8 Beta (a version from ages ago) and walked close enough to load half of the village's chunks.

    Then I converted to 1.11, and walked to the results and was pleased all-the-while perplexed. Firstly, the operation was a success. Through Polyworld-based mechanics, we can find half-structures. Like I said, arguably these are then the most rare structures one can find, as the conditions for one to generate are so scarce.

    Although I didn't want to meander on and on too much in the video, I want to bring up one thing that caught my interest. The village that was "cut off" with the borders of old and new chunks, actually slightly leaked over into the old chunks. Not only did it slightly leak over, but what would be the grass road actually adapted to the surrounding water and became a wooden dock. That's crazy! When I did this with the Woodland Mansion as shown later in the video, it was a completely clean cut, so it leads me to wonder if not all structures are generated equal.

    In summary, we tackled the basic mechanics of polyworlds, and also found out half-structures can be done.
    But now I'm dying to know, what's the highest possible "polyworld degree" as mentioned in the video? And what causes some structures to adapt to old chunks like the lingering village? While others just go with the flow of the new borders?

    Anyway I hope you enjoyed my spiel and the discoveries I made. Perhaps you guys can help me figure out some of these later questions that stemmed from this initial investigation!
    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on How Big is Minecraft? The Other Side of the Coin

    Huh? I'm not sure what you're talking about. If you mean the distance from the center of the map to the edge of the world then yes, it's 30 million blocks. Like I said in the video that leads us to find one edge of the world is 60 million blocks, and the whole world is really a 60 million by 60 million block square. one block is a meter long, so that leads us to find the minecraft world is 3.6 quadrillion square meters, or 3.6 billion square kilometers when you convert to square km.

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on How Big is Minecraft? The Other Side of the Coin

    By extending the X/Z coordinates of Minecraft so much that it trumps the Earth's volume, it would have to become an insane size in surface area.

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on How Big is Minecraft? The Other Side of the Coin

    That's a really cool video you linked, I have been getting some requests to do a video similar to this last one but about the Nether, and the information already there as well as seeing how it's implemented like in the video mentioned above, there might be a lot to look into.


    For Minecraft to have equal volume to the earth, it'd have to come out to ‎1.08321×1012 km3


    It turns out to be some pretty straight-forward algebra. Feel free to correct me if my math is wrong because I'm just quickly glancing over this, converting everything to km first to make it easier, we know that for our cubical model of Minecraft we simply need to use the l*w*h equation to find volume. length is 60,000 km, width is 60,000 km, and height is unknown for now. If you want it to be equal to the earth's volume, you simply make some kind of equation like this.



    (60000 km)(60000 km)(x km) =1.08321×1012 km3
    Height = 300.8km = 300,891.6 meters

    Again I might have made a simple mistake, but when you convert it back to meters it looks like you need the height to be about 300,892 meters, basically 301,000 blocks high, around 1200 times the current height.

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on How Big is Minecraft? The Other Side of the Coin

    Thanks, always glad to see people who appreciate the work I put out

    Posted in: Discussion
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    posted a message on How Big is Minecraft? The Other Side of the Coin

    Interesting how it's actually more realistic than I realized to walk to the far lands. Still incredible nonetheless, but then walking 30 million meters out would be a truly crazy feat, or one side to another, 60 million meters. Using your player speed of 1.43 m/s, It would take 485.6 days of continuous walking to get from one side of the map to the other. At one hour a day of straight, continuous walking that'd take 32 years almost. Really I think the biggest challenge is walking straight non-stop for an extended duration, because I don't know how many have the patience to keep up the long drone in one continuous direction. Fun to talk about though!

    Posted in: Discussion
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