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    posted a message on AoA--25 New Dimensions• 330 Mobs• 27 Bosses• Skills• Quests• 600+Items [LARGE Bugfix Update, May 2018]
    Quote from The_Slayer

    And if the team really did complain about me, why would they stay with me and start a new mod with ME?!

    I'm pretty sure a few of us did so, in this thread.
    Myself included :P
    Posted in: Minecraft Mods
  • 2

    posted a message on How to create forge mod addons
    And if you reference the library like you normaly would then it should be fine...
    Posted in: Modification Development
  • 1

    posted a message on A few novice questions on mod creation.
    Quote from Wolfguarde

    Geforce - I'm leaning towards using forge, though I more want to learn the finer details of java. I used some of thenewboston's tutorials when I tried to learn C++, I didn't realise he had java tutorials as well.


    Hey!

    I've been studying programming and computers for two years now and I would like to yell out my opinion(s).

    TheNewBoston is an okay source for learning keywords and syntax but if you are new to computer science and programming, then it won't give you all you need to know.

    My few cents:

    I would recommend taking the FREE online course from Stanford university:
    introduction to computer science | programming methodology
    http://see.stanford....aa-866adcae1111

    You can download all the special software and all the assignments/handouts given in the real class on that website.
    That's the place where I would start.

    After that I would play around with making small Java programs and then move on to CS106B and mayhaps cs107 if I found it interesting. I would then focus on making games like Tetris and Space Invaders in java, you have no idea how much one can learn from such small projects.

    After a while you will be quite used to Java syntax (The grammar of the Java language) and the OOP (Object Oriented Programming) paragdim. Then it would be a good time to look into Software architecture and Design patterns, why? Because that's when you really start to learn programming! Learning those things will speed up your coding, and lessen your debug frustration by a great deal.
    If you are comfy with C++ as in more than just the basic syntax then TheNewBoston might be all you'd need. It depends on how used you are to working with objects and how good you have become at breaking down problems to small logical components.

    I do intend to learn other languages, though I will be sticking to Java and C++ for the first few steps in learning, just to get the knack for what I'm doing.

    If you follow the above mentioned course it will lead into CS106B (C++) and over to CS107 which deals with a lot of different languages, giving you a introduction to different programming paradigms not just OOP. Even if the 106 courses are uninteresting and well-known stuff to you I would recommend looking into the CS107 videos :)

    As for learning languages, I would focus mainly on one language for a longer period of time.
    Once you are used to a language you will easily pick up any other language in the same paradigm quickly (as in a few days!).
    For example if you are well traversed in Java, you will be able to get into other OOP languages like Python, Ruby or C# in 2-3 days.


    I've never been too clear on what else Forge does, aside from loading/managing mods and providing extra IDs to use.

    Forge does not in it self load mods. That is the purpose of a different mod called FML (Forge Mod Loader).
    FML's only purpose is to Load and manage mods, and is defined by the Forge team as "an opensource replacement mod loader for minecraft".

    MinecraftForge is noted as "Modifications to the Minecraft base files to assist in compatibility between mods."
    Forge does inject patches into the base files (Ninja base editing @ runtime startup).
    These modify the source in order to provide hooks into Minecraft's internal functionality so that we (the modders) can add/manipulate it without editing base classes.

    The way it does this is by various methods such as Events and Reflection.
    It's true that there's overwhelmingly much to get into at once, but there's some documentation in the code to help you with concepts.
    Also the best documentation is there, the source code it self. If what you want exists in vanilla, you can look into it's code to get an idea of how it has to be etc.

    Minecraft's code is weird and f**ked up at times.
    Just figuring out the ups and downs of simple things such as blocks and how they work can be confusing.
    Enter TGG's great blogg: greyminecraftcoder.blogspot.no/p/list-of-topics.html
    Here he has gathered posts about how the code works internally, making it easier for us others to understand how things work and thereby how to use it properly. I recommend reading the first articles and use the page as a reference along with the Minecraft Wiki :)



    Okay once you are done with your introduction to Java and are ready to get into forge I would recommend starting with 1.6.4 as 1.7.2 while ready for modding is not as widely explored and hence not much intro material is written yet.
    I would recommend looking into VSWE's great summer courses on youtube which dealt with Forge modding from the pure basics building up into the most advance GUI's shown in a tutorial. He also deals with animation and model imports among other things!
    www.youtube.com/user/VsweGoesMinecraft/videos?flow=grid&view=50&shelf_id=3


    There you go!
    I hope it helped and I wish you good luck on your programming endeavors!
    Posted in: Modification Development
  • 1

    posted a message on How do I start Java
    Hey!

    I've been studying programming and computers for two years now and I would like to yell out my opinion(s).

    TheNewBoston is an okay source for learning keywords and syntax but if you are new to computer science and programming, then it won't give you all you need to know.

    I would recommend taking the FREE online course from Stanford university:
    introduction to computer science | programming methodology
    http://see.stanford.edu/see/lecturelist.aspx?coll=824a47e1-135f-4508-a5aa-866adcae1111

    You can download all the special software and all the assignments/handouts given in the real class on that website.
    That's the place where I would start.

    After that I would play around with making small Java programs and then move on to CS106B and mayhaps cs107 if I found it interesting. I would then focus on making games like Tetris and Space Invaders in java, you have no idea how much one can learn from such small projects.

    After a while you will be quite used to Java syntax (The grammar of the Java language) and the OOP (Object Oriented Programming) paragdim. Then it would be a good time to look into Software architecture and Design patterns, why? Because that's when you really start to learn programming! Learning those things will speed up your coding, and lessen your debug frustration by a great deal.


    Some key things to note when you start:

    * You learn most by doing, type out all examples don't just watch and read, go and DO!

    * 80% of the time spent programming is NOT spent writing code. It's spent on reading and finding mistakes!
    - This is why learning more than just syntax is vital! If you seriously want to program, then learn about OOP, Code organization and design patterns!

    * Failing, crashing and weird errors are SUPER common!
    - But they are also your best chances to learn ;) You learn more by mistakes than by success, and as you go you will notice that you need outside help with fewer and fewer crashes!

    * Don't aim to high! (at the start)
    - The most common error beginners do is to aim for "The next big Mod" or the next "Indie Super Hit game". Start with smaller projects and work your way upwards, that's the fastest way to get experience and get ready for the advance stuff ;)
    Posted in: Modification Development
  • 1

    posted a message on [Forge][1.6.X] Maz's Tutorials - Custom Sounds & Fluids[19.07.13]
    @CoolAlias:
    That is very much possible, at least to load them all into the mod.
    Heres part of what I used to load textures dynamicly, it could probably do just as well with sounds.
    URL url = PlayMod.class.getResource("/assets/playmod/textures/blocks/");
    try {
      String[] files = new File(url.toURI()).list();
      if (files!= null && files.length > 0)
      {
       for (int i = 0; i < files.length; i++)
       {
        // DO STUFF
       }
      }
    } catch (URISyntaxException e) {
      // TODO Auto-generated catch block
      e.printStackTrace();
    }

    PlayMod is the @Mod class and playmod is the modid.
    Posted in: Mapping and Modding Tutorials
  • 1

    posted a message on Copying NBT on crafting [unsolved]
    Side question!

    Wouldn't life be easier for you if you did this instead?

    @Override
    public void onCreated(ItemStack itemStack, World world,
       EntityPlayer player) {
    
     if(itemStack.stackTagCompound == null)
         itemStack.setTagCompound(new NBTTagCompound());
    
     itemStack.stackTagCompound.setInteger("damage", this.getDamage(itemStack));
    
    }
    Posted in: Modification Development
  • 1

    posted a message on Copying NBT on crafting [unsolved]
    Why would you use that? :P
    Posted in: Modification Development
  • 1

    posted a message on Copying NBT on crafting [unsolved]
    You need to keep track of all the 5 tags.
    Create a new NBT consisting of all 5 of them, instead of overwriting the one it has over and over :)
    Posted in: Modification Development
  • 1

    posted a message on [1.6.4][Forge][Solved] How to save an integer/string in a block? And how to make the block drop an item on right click?
    Quote from QuicK2800

    *sigh*...

    You can go about modding 1 of 2 ways (in my opinion):

    1. Learn Java, so that you don't need to use a mod API, and can actually create the mod you want.

    2. Learn the mod APIs so that your mod will be compatible with other mods and you will be extremely limited on what you want to actually do.

    It's your choice.


    2. Learn java so you can use the mod API's properly at all.
    Posted in: Modification Development
  • 1

    posted a message on I need help with updating a mod's Minecraft version (Maybe).
    Quote from Spencerio
    I need to know if there's any additional stuff I need to do (Such as shifting IDs (I don't know if I need to), etc.).

    Quote from QuicK2800

    The developers should take care of any ID shifting, or other programming needs when they update the mod.


    Do NOT take care of ID shifting, do not do anything in order to counter the shifted IDs.
    Minecraft uses shifted index and that's fine, don't mess with it!
    Else you will set yourself up for ghost ID conflicts with other mods ID's as well as potentially make room for internal ghost conflicts as well.

    Yes minecraft shifts it by 256 and that's fine you should not attempt to "fix" it.
    Just leave the shifted index alone and it's all fine.
    Posted in: Modification Development
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