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    posted a message on Text Ads Everywhere?
    And it was...? Perhaps other users have this problem, so posting the solution would be beneficial for both them and the forums, as they wouldn't have to make another thread with the same question.
    Posted in: Computer Science and Technology
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    posted a message on How do TechEd Teachers drive you insane?
    Quote from sheenrox82

    Unfortunately, I talked to the Principal about it, well..... Tried to, she said she would get in contact with me when she could talk and she said it would be in 3 days or so when she wasn't "busy", it's been 2 weeks....


    Persist. Attempt to talk to her daily about it.
    Posted in: Computer Science and Technology
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    posted a message on Overclocking & PSUs
    Uh.. I might be missing something here, but you don't appear to have listed your power supply. What PSU do you have?
    Posted in: Hardware & Software Support
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    posted a message on Physics - Yay
    If you have a stronger background in calculus than in physics like I do, then my approach might be easier/make more sense. This post assumes you have a pretty good understanding of derivatives.

    Let's define a few terms and write down what we have so far.

    All of the outputs of these functions are in meters.
    Displacement is some function D(t).
    The velocity is V(t) = D'(t)
    The acceleration is A(t) = V'(t) = D"(t)

    We know that V(0) = 0, and that V(6.27) = 10.4082.
    We also know that A(t) = c, which means that the velocity function is linear.
    Since the velocity function is linear, that means the displacement function's highest degree is 2, meaning it is of the form f(x) = ax^2 + bx + c, where a and b are any real numbers. We know b = 0 because if we derive that function, we are left with f'(x) = 2ax + b, and we know that f'(x) = V(t), and V(0) = 0. That leaves us with f'(x) = ax.

    We can then find the slope of the velocity function, which will then give us what we need for the displacement function (you could use an integral, but this is a pretty basic function).

    From there, you anti-derive that mofo, and you've got yourself the displacement function. Now you can find the displacement at any point. Wheee!
    Posted in: Computer Science and Technology
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    posted a message on Computer Tips and Tricks
    Quote from XistenZ


    This is you, right?


    Yep.
    Posted in: Computer Science and Technology
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    posted a message on Computer Tips and Tricks
    Quote from Firestryke31

    47: Don't be afraid to build your PC a little at a time. I started with a bare minimum CPU+MoBo+RAM, then added somewhat beefy PSU, then a GPU, then a SSD, and now I'm saving for some HDDs, and eventually another GPU and more RAM. I have a decent computer, and it's only getting better as I go.


    Don't do this unless the time span is like two weeks. You'll end up wasting money because prices change. Just buy everything all at once. Upgrades are fine, but don't plan the initial build around constant upgrades.

    Quote from Firestryke31

    49: Exception to 48; Go ahead and plan for upgradability. If you're gonna eventually have 4 4TB HDDs in a RAID5 with dual graphics cards and a top of the line CPU, go ahead and get the OP PSU. But only if you know that's what you want.


    A slight alteration:

    49.1: Buy parts for upgradability only if you know for a fact that you will buy the upgrade parts.

    Quote from SM8

    52. Dell monitors die. A lot.


    I've had my Dell monitor for about 2 years now, and it looks as good as the day I bought it, if not better (I've fiddled with the colors a bit more). Perhaps their lower tier monitors aren't that high of quality, but their Ultrasharp series is top notch.

    Quote from Firestryke31

    In fact, don't use an SSD at all unless you're willing to do all of the work needed to use it well.


    That's completely false. The only real big change is how you initially set it up, but that is it. Other than not defragging, there aren't any mandatory changes that need to be made.

    Quote from XistenZ

    66. Never let anyone except you use your computer. They will, somehow, break it.


    That's a bit drastic. I break that rule all the time on my girlfriend and my friend's computers, and pretty much everyone's computers, and it is mostly a reflexive property.

    66.1: Don't let someone you don't trust use your computer. If someone you know will use your computer a lot, make them an account on the OS so they don't have administrator access.
    Posted in: Computer Science and Technology
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    posted a message on Benefits of Owning a Server.
    That depends. What are you using a server for?
    Posted in: Computer Science and Technology
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    posted a message on Which browser should I use?
    Quote from Synedragore

    This made me laugh. The whole reason I made this post is because I cannot use Google Chrome anymore. Did you not read the OP?



    Quote from SM8

    ... And chrome!


    Reading is overrated anyway.

    (I say that right after I finish reading The Green Mile lol)
    Posted in: Hardware & Software Support
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    posted a message on Which browser should I use?
    Try out

    Firefox
    Opera
    Safari

    for a week each, and then you'll have your answer.
    Posted in: Hardware & Software Support
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    posted a message on Pastebin-style App
    Quote from iTippy


    There isn't a repo at the moment. Users are generated via a hash of random strings the application generates. Later on when I finish the actual website, I can allow users to assign their usernames based on their unique ID.

    Also, the MIME is text/plaintext (txt). It will not execute any code.

    Still a work in progress.


    No repo? Do you have no source control? o.o!
    Posted in: Hardware & Software Support
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    posted a message on What is wrong in this Python code?
    Quote from warmachine2598

    Well first of i'm adding something to my Original post instead of just making a new thread.
    (I'm now using 3.2 because of some recomendtions i got btw)

    everytime i run this it gives me the same error:

    Code:


    #Python 3.2.0
    x='100'
    buy1='20'


    print ('You have, ' +x 'dollars')
    print ('Would you like to buy an item for 20 dollars? : ')
    confirm = input()
    if confirm == ('yes'):
    print ('You have' ,x-buy1, 'dollars left' )
    else:
    print ('you have', x, 'dollars left')

    Error:

    Gives me syntax errors:

    Problem: I dont understand what i wrote wrong, can someone help me?


    It would help if you posted where the issue happens exactly, but I see more than just a syntax error (use code tags!). I'm guessing the first syntax error occurs on this line:

    print ('You have, ' +x 'dollars')


    If you are going to do that, then you need to use the + sign on both sides of the x variable. However, the more Pythonic way of formatting your strings is to use, well, string formatting.

    print ('You have %d dollars' % x)


    That works if x is a number, else you'll want to use "%s" instead of "%d". Since you are trying to subtract x and buy1, they should both be numbers instead of strings.
    Quote from Cheezedoom

    First of all, it would probably be better to use one statement to set your x variable to itself minus buy1. The way you were doing it would display the proper amount, but the actual variable would not be changed.

    Your actual error, though, was that you are not using the plus signs/commas correctly. Here's how your code could look:
    x='100'
    buy1='20'
    
    print ('You have, ' + x + 'dollars')
    print ('Would you like to buy an item for 20 dollars? : ')
    confirm = input()
    if confirm == ('yes'):
        x = x - buy1
        print ('You have' + x + 'dollars left' )
    else:
        print ('you have' + x + 'dollars left')

    This won't actually work, though, because your x and buy1 variables are currently strings. If you want to use them as numbers instead, and do number-like operations on them, simply write the number without quotes. (This will make the variables integers). However, when you want to print out the variables to the screen, you will have to use str(var).

    Another thing that you can do with this revised code is make it a little more compact. Here's the final code, you should see where I removed a few lines:
    x=100
    buy1=20
    
    print ('You have, ' + str(x) + 'dollars')
    print ('Would you like to buy an item for 20 dollars? : ')
    confirm = input()
    if confirm == ('yes'):
        x = x - buy1
    print ('you have'+ str(x) + 'dollars left')

    I'm not going to fix your grammatical errors, though ;) .


    (Side note: you could also have the variables as strings, and when you are doing mathematical operations just use int(var) in the same way I used str(var) here. It just made more sense to have numbers saved as, well, numbers.)


    To enhance the example more, I have more Pythonic code below.

    x=100
    buy1=20
    
    print ('You have, %d dollars' % x)
    confirm = input('Would you like to buy an item for 20 dollars? : ')
    if confirm == 'yes':
        x -= buy1
    print ('You have %d dollars left' % x)


    It accomplishes the same task, but it does so in less code.
    Posted in: Hardware & Software Support
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    posted a message on Pastebin-style App
    Seems pretty interesting. What are the MIME types of the files being uploaded? I assume just plain text so the browser doesn't try anything funny.

    How are users managed? I don't really see a way for people to sign in on the website itself.

    Do you have a repo I could check out? o.O
    Posted in: Hardware & Software Support
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    posted a message on What is wrong in this Python code?
    My guess is that you're using Python 2.7, as that would work in Python 3. You are using the wrong input function; you want to use raw_input() to capture strings. input() captures integers or floats.

    e. If you want to know more closely what is happening, then keep on reading.

    When you call the input() function, it attempts to evaluate the name you've just given it. When you enter numbers, it just stores the numbers because they can't have names; however, if you try to enter a string, it assigns the name you to whatever the value is for the string you just gave input().

    So let's say you have already defined a variable, and let's call it "foo". Now let's make another variable named "bar" that makes a call to the input() function. If we put in 'bar', instead of foo storing the string 'bar', it assigns the value of bar to foo. Some code to help explain:

    >>> foo = 'string'
    >>> bar = input()
    foo
    >>> foo
    'string'
    >>> bar
    'string'
    Posted in: Hardware & Software Support
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    posted a message on AAAAnnnnnddddd I'm Capped.
    Quote from CrazyJayCloudz

    I hate when people complain about ****ing **** like this.

    Okay, you think 100Gb per month is "small."
    You think 256/kbs is "small".

    Try and be me, where I have 10Gb per month(used to be 3), and it runs at a constant 20kb/s speed. So many people have worse internet than you.

    You should be grateful you even have internet


    I've got to agree with this.

    While my internet isn't as bad as yours (1.5Mbps), it is still lower than a lot of the people who complain of "slow" internet.

    I have unlimited bandwidth as well.
    Posted in: Computer Science and Technology
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    posted a message on Apple's Q4 numbers should be record-breaking, thanks to the iPhone 5
    Quote from WinCamXP

    This is so much more amusing with the Chrome extension "In My Words".



    While it can sometimes make it hard to focus on the actual message, it speaks the truth very well...


    That's very childish, but very amusing lol.
    Posted in: Computer Science and Technology
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