Sheep breeding question.

  • #21
    Minecraft: Punnet Square Edition
  • #22

    When you breed a Full Black and a Full white cat, your not gonna get a gray cat.
    Your mostly gonna get whatever color is the dominant gene.

    It's much more complex than that since many genes are involved and even if two cats have identical genes their furs can still look different.
  • #23
    Painting sheep green and getting green baby sheep would be as bad for geneticists as it was for sheepshearers when punching them made the blocks come out.
  • #24

    Spots are example.

    When you breed a Full Black and a Full white cat, your not gonna get a gray cat.

    Your mostly gonna get whatever color is the dominant gene.


    You might actually get a gray cat, it depends on the genetics. There are, rarely, brown, gray, white and chestnut Friesians even though that breed is pre-dominantly black.
  • #25
    Quote from Starmute

    Zero.

    ^

    Hopefully they will at least make the offspring random colors again. All white sheep herds are boring.
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  • #26
    Expanding on the "it depends" with a human example, dealing with a darker parent and a lighter parent, the child will be no darker than the dark parent and no lighter than the light parent, usually falling somewhere around the middle ground, because pigment doesn't actually work like that (dominant/recessive color) in many cases. It's important to note that different species color genes can behave very differently. Do we want to simulate actual real world sheep genetics, or should we make up a simplified Minecraft system with a loose basis on genetics? Most likely the latter. Because who actually wants to keep genealogy charts for their virtual sheep? The question is then how to do this and off what premise to base it.
    Stupid people say stupid things. Sometimes smart people say stupid things too. It's when the stupid people say smart things that life gets interesting.
  • #27
    On reddit, notch said he tried to make it so breeding colored sheep would yeild colored sheep. However, it doesn't actually work due to a bug. So it is perfectly feasible that they may breed colored in later updates.
    And forget real genetics, this is a game. We follow the rule of fun in game design, and the rule of fun says we breed colored sheep.
  • #28
    One word "mutations"

    That's how the abomination of a creeper was born, from pigs.....
  • #29
    This post has been edited in order to account for the current phenomenon of colored sheep babies.

    In Minecraft, sheep can spawn naturally with wool colors of white, light gray, gray, black, brown, and pink.

    According to the Minecraft wiki, the percentage rates are as follows:
    White - 81.84%
    Light Gray - 5%
    Gray - 5%
    Black - 5%
    Brown - 3%
    Pink - 0.16%

    If you want to breed colored sheep, first we'll tackle the colors that spawn naturally:

    For breeding purposes, since brown and pink are the least common, we could make those recessive genes that would only show up if two brown sheep or two pink sheep are bred. If a brown or pink sheep is bred with any other sheep, the offspring will be the color of the non-recessive type parent. If a brown sheep and a pink sheep are bred, brown would win out since it's gene is more dominant than the pink.

    Since white is the most common color by percentage, it would be the most dominant of the color genes. A white sheep bred with any other color sheep would always result in a white sheep.

    Since light gray, gray, and black all have the same probability of spawning naturally, these colors could be co-dominant with each other. A light gray sheep bred with another light gray would result in light gray offspring. A light gray sheep bred with a black sheep would yield a gray sheep. Black with black would produce a black sheep. A light gray and a gray sheep would result in a 50/50 chance of having either a light gray or gray offspring. The same 50/50 chance would apply when breeding a gray and black.

    White would always be dominant over all other colors.
    Light gray, gray, and black are co-dominant with each other, and dominant over both brown and pink.
    Brown is dominant over pink.
    Pink is the most recessive and illusive sheep color to breed.

    All other sheep colors can only be obtained by dying the sheep with wool. Until recently, baby sheep did not inherit the dye color of their parents. However, they do now. Apparently there is a gene-altering chemical in the dye or something.

    Colored sheep genetics would work a bit differently. By default, all "rainbow" sheep genes would be co-dominant with each other. Normally white is the most dominant gene of all, but when white is bred with a colored sheep, the results can vary.

    Red sheep + red sheep = red sheep
    Red sheep + white sheep = pink sheep
    Red sheep + yellow sheep = orange sheep
    orange sheep + orange sheep = orange sheep
    yellow sheep + yellow sheep = yellow sheep
    Yellow sheep + blue sheep = green sheep
    Green sheep + green sheep = green sheep
    Green sheep + white sheep = lime sheep
    lime sheep + lime sheep = lime sheep
    Green sheep + Blue sheep = cyan sheep
    cyan sheep + cyan sheep = cyan sheep
    Blue sheep + white sheep = light blue sheep
    Light blue sheep + light blue sheep = light blue sheep
    Blue sheep + red sheep = purple sheep
    Purple sheep + purple sheep = purple sheep
    Purple sheep + pink sheep = magenta sheep
    magenta sheep + magenta sheep = magenta sheep

    All other breeding combinations not listed here, including breeding a rainbow with a natural color, would result in a 50/50 chance of each of the parents' colors. For example, a green sheep bred with a purple sheep would yeild a 50% chance of producing either a green or purple offspring. A cyan sheep bred with a white sheep would produce a 50% chance of either a cyan or white offspring.
  • #30
    Quote from Malacodor

    It's much more complex than that since many genes are involved and even if two cats have identical genes their furs can still look different.


    Well yeah through all the generations of cats :tongue.gif:

    I meant as purely created.
  • #31
    Mendel is disappoint.
  • #32
    Quote from Divine Insect

    In Minecraft, sheep can spawn naturally with wool colors of white, light gray, gray, black, brown, and pink.

    According to the Minecraft wiki, the percentage rates are as follows:
    White - 81.84%
    Light Gray - 5%
    Gray - 5%
    Black - 5%
    Brown - 3%
    Pink - 0.16%

    If you want to breed colored sheep, first we'll tackle the colors that spawn naturally:

    For breeding purposes, since brown and pink are the least common, we could make those recessive genes that would only show up if two brown sheep or two pink sheep are bred. If a brown or pink sheep is bred with any other sheep, the offspring will be the color of the non-recessive type parent. If a brown sheep and a pink sheep are bred, brown would win out since it's gene is more dominant than the pink.

    Since white is the most common color by percentage, it would be the most dominant of the color genes. A white sheep bred with any other color sheep would always result in a white sheep.

    Since light gray, gray, and black all have the same probability of spawning naturally, these colors could be co-dominant with each other. A light gray sheep bred with another light gray would result in light gray offspring. A light gray sheep bred with a black sheep would yield a gray sheep. Black with black would produce a black sheep. A light gray and a gray sheep would result in a 50/50 chance of having either a light gray or gray offspring. The same 50/50 chance would apply when breeding a gray and black.

    White would always be dominant over all other colors.
    Light gray, gray, and black are co-dominant with each other, and dominant over both brown and pink.
    Brown is dominant over pink.
    Pink is the most recessive and illusive sheep color to breed.

    All other sheep colors can only be obtained by dying the sheep with wool. This does not affect their genetics. Hence, it would not affect breeding. Colored sheep would breed offspring of the color they genetically inherited, not the color of the dye in their wool.


    Gene-altering color potions fed to sheep, perhaps? :smile.gif:
    Dying a sheep naturally could produce colored wool for one cycle of wool growth. One sheared, it would grow back the original color. However, a more expensive color potion could be fed to a sheep and turn it into a genetic abomination that produces colored wool forever (or until killed or fed a different color of color potion). These mutated rainbow sheep could breed rainbow sheep offspring.

    Science!! This would be awesome to have some biology. I hope that the breeding turns into something like this
  • #33
    Quote from Kizd

    Mendel is disappoint.


    See my earlier post. Seems I'm the only one here to suggested a logical genetic system, at least for the naturally spawning sheep types.

    EDIT: and now possibly rainbow varieties as well.
  • #34
    Quote from Strottinglemon

    That's not how genes work. If you breed a white rabbit with a black rabbit, the rabbit will not be black with white spots or white with black spots. The dominant trait will emerge, whichever color it is, and the baby rabbits will be one solid color. However, they will still be carriers of the recessive color.

    The point is, it should be either color of the parents. 50/50.

    Not all genes work that way. There is also Co dominant and I forget the one where they mix. Of course you have to wait until Biology I to know this so I'm not blaming you for not knowing.

    Also the reason it doesn't work like that is so people can't get infinite blue wool from just 2 lapis.
  • #35
    I still think a chocobo-esque breeding system would be bitchin. I was hoping to get a gray/black lamb after breeding the two. Was mildly disappointed to see it just spawned another white lamb. Not really a big deal, though. Most dyes aren't hard to come by.
    Life is not measured in the breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.
  • #36
    Quote from Divine Insect

    Seems I'm the only one here to suggested a logical genetic system, at least for the naturally spawning sheep types.

    I didn't want to create the situation described by your avatar. :wink.gif:

    Quote from Hyperventilate

    Most dyes aren't hard to come by.

    But if you need brown wool you're screwed.
  • #37
  • #38
    I stand corrected, I guess people do speak biology here.
  • #39
    I :Sheep:
  • #40
    I don't think sheep who have had their wool dyed post-natal should have lambs with the dyed color wool. That makes no sense to me, any one who can make sense of it should go back to Dr. Suess land.

    BUT there should be a chance that when a lamb is born it can have one of the naturally spawned wool colors. Cocoa beans are not common, and I like brown wool....
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